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Ed. Note: Except where otherwise noted, all records herein were provided by the late Combs Researcher Becky Goodin. Our Combs researcher Leslie (Bridges) Kohler is the sister of Becky and continues with the family research.
You can contact her at the following email address: ~~ Leslie ~~

Now online - Combs &c. - Narrative of the life of General Leslie Combs Embracing Incidents In The Early History Of The North—Western Territory.


Fondly Dedicated to the Memory of
Becky Goodin and her beloved husband Cully

On June 14, 1997, Becky and Cully were killed by a drunk driver. Becky was a wonderful person -- a good and giving researcher whose presence will be missed greatly by all, and we offer our heartfelt sympathy and condolences to their family. In the last few months, Becky had provided us with over 40 wp files filled with records reflecting her many years of diligent research. Memorials to Becky and Cully may be sent to the Carrollton Public Library, Genealogy Department, c/o Leslie (Bridges) Kohler, P.O. Box 276, Carrollton, MO 64633-0276. ~~ Leslie ~~

Leslie COMBS (s/o Benjamin & Sarah RICHARDSON Combs), b 29 Nov 1793, Clark Co, KY, d 21 Aug 1881, Lexington, Fayette Co, KY; m (1) 1 Sep 1818, Fayette Co, KY, Margaret TROTTER; (2) 11 Apr 1849, Manville, Providence, RI, Mary Elizabeth BROWNELL.

Children by Margaret TROTTER:

  1. Franklin COMBS was born in 1824. He died in 1844 in Louisiana.
  2. Alfred Howard COMBS was born about 1823. He died on 13 Nov 1825 in Lexington, Fayette Co, Kentucky.
  3. Mary Rebecca COMBS was born about 1826. She died after 1873. 25 Mar 1846. Lexington Fayette Co, KY. She was married to Alexander J. MITCHELL on 25 Mar 1846 in Fayette Co, Kentucky.
  4. Leslie COMBS Jr. was born on 12 Jan 1831. He died on 15 Feb 1836 in Lexington, Fayette Co, Kentucky.
  5. Georgette A COMBS was born before 1832 in Lexington, Fayette Co, Kentucky. She died before 1918 in Kansas City, Jackson Co, Missouri. She was married to Col. William Alfred WARNER before 1875
  6. LaBelle COMBS was born before 1833. She died after 1872. She was married to Col. Saunders D. BRUCE on 27 Jan 1848 in Fayette Co, Kentucky.
  7. John Tilford COMBS was born in Aug 1833. He died on 24 Nov 1834 in Lexington, Fayette Co, Kentucky.
  8. Howard Tilford COMBS was born on 19 Apr 1835 in Lexington, Fayette Co, Kentucky. He appeared on the census in 1850 in Fayette Co, Kentucky. He resided in 1856 in Quincy, Adams Co, Illinois. He resided in 1870 in Carroll Co, Missouri. He died on 16 (or 22?) Jul 1880 in Lexington, Fayette Co, Kentucky. He was buried in Lexington, Fayette Co, Kentucky.
  9. Margaret Leslie “Mag” COMBS was born on 19 Mar 1837. She appeared on the census in 1850 in Fayette Co, Kentucky.4 She died on 29 Mar 1917 in Lexington, Fayette Co, Kentucky. She was married to Samuel DOWNING on 15 Oct 1855 in Christ Church, Lexington, Fayette Co, Kentucky.
  10. Elizabeth B COMBS was born on 23 Mar 1839. She died on 23 Mar 1841.

Children by Mary Elizabeth BROWNELL

  1. Elizabeth B. COMBS was born in 1850 in Kentucky. She appeared on the census in 1850 in Fayette Co, Kentucky. She died after 1873.
  2. Ambassador Leslie COMBS III was born on 31 Jul 1852 in Rhode Island. He died on 18 Nov 1940 in Fayette Co, Kentucky. He was buried on 20 Nov 1940 in Lexington Cem, Fayette Co, Kentucky. He was married to Mary C. SWIGERT before 1881.

More about General Leslie COMBS…

Relics of the Olden Time -- Leslie Combs

“The quaint and beautiful costumes of the old colonial days were not quite extinct, even in 1818. At entertainments, and on full dress occasions in Lexington, at that date, old gentlemen were frequently seen arrayed in all the magnificence of square coats, ruffled shirt-bosom, court vest, lace cuffs, short breeches, knee-buckles, and white stockings; and elderly ladies looked grand in wonderfully long-waisted dressed, with immense ruffles about the elbows, and with their powdered hair towering aloft on cushions.

“General Leslie COMBS settled in Lexington in 1818, and has made it his home ever since that time. General COMBS was born in Clark County, Kentucky, November 28, 1793. His father was a Virginian, and mother a Marylander. During the war of 1812, General COMBS, at the age of nineteen, distinguished himself by his courage and gallantry. In the campaign which ended at Raisin, he was sent with a dispatch from General Winchester to General HARRISON, and in the execution of his trust, traversed the pathless wilderness through snow and water for a hundred miles, and endured privations which nearly cost him his life. In April, 1812, he was commissioned Captain of scouts, and was attached to the force under General Green CLAY, which had been ordered to the relief of Fort Meigs. Captain COMBS volunteered, with the assistance of an Indian guide and four men, to carry the news of Clay's approach to HARRISON. He succeeded in threading his perilous way through swarms of hostile savages, and had arrived in sight of the closely invested fort, when he was attacked by Indians, one of his men killed, another wounded, and he and the rest of his little band, after intense suffering, escaped, in a starving condition, back to Fort Defiance.

“Subsequently, he took a gallant part in the disastrous defeat of Colonel William DUDLEY, on the 5th of May, was wounded, taken prisoner, and compelled to run the gauntlet at Fort Miami.

“After the war, General COMBS settled in Lexington, where he practiced law for nearly half a century. In 1836, General COMBS raised a regiment for the southwestern frontier, at the time of the Texas revolution. As a lawyer trustee of Transylvania University, member of the legislature, railroad pioneer, state auditor, and a brilliant and sparkling speaker, General COMBS has stood in high respect among his fellow citizens. After a long and eventful life, the "boy-captain of 1812" is still among us. He resides on Main, between Limestone and Rose, and adjoining First Christian Church.

(Extracted by Combs Researcher Becky Goodin from History of Lexington, by George W. Ranck, 1982)

Excerpted by Combs Researcher Barbara Mathews form Appletons' Journal: a magazine of general literature./ vol. 12, iss. 289 Publication Date: Oct 3, 1874, City: New York, Publisher: D. Appleton and Company. Pages: 836, From Bell's Tavern by King, R. H.:

Belle's Tavern, a reminiscence of Ante-Bellem days in Kentucky - Excerpt from the article Belle Normandie, Miscellany:

“Who that visited the Mammoth Cave of Kentucky before "th cruel war," does not remember the rural vine-covered inn, "Bell's Tavern" where travelers and tourists sojourned for an hour, a day, or days, perhaps for rest and refreshment previous to the brief coach-journey to the underground wonder…”

“Here I met General Leslie Coombs, the one living man whom I know who has actually found the elixir of youth. Hair black as a raven, and no dye; white teeth, with no dentist's bill behind it! He was, and is even now, at an advanced age, the most youthful, vigorous, and charming of men.”

“Charles Dickens wrote his name on the register of Bell's Tavern, acknowledged his peach and honey very good (this is a marginal note), went over to Mammoth Cave, and returned for another glass.”

“Years later, I went back to the old place. Bell's Tavern lay in ruins, the victim of a destructive fire. I wandered into the garden. The tangled roses bloomed in fragrance and beauty. The strawberries grew at their own sweet will, but the spirit fo desolation reigned.”

Rhoda Hite King


Transcription by Combs Researcher Becky Goodin of the

LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT OF
LESLIE Combs
Begun Aug. 14, 1873
Signed Oct. 8, 1875
Codicil dated July 2, 1879
Probated in the County Court
Fayette Co., Kentucky
And recorded in Will Book 6, p. 54
Will Book 6 page 54
This is my last will. August 14th
Leslie COMBS

Page No. 1

1st. Item
I was born on my father's 100 acre farm within six miles of Booneboro, on the public trace road to the Lower Blue Licks on the 29th of November 1793 and altho in my eightieth year and in perfect, mental and bodily health my hair is yet thick on my head and only slightly sprinkled with white, and not an unsound tooth in my head thank God, when we sold the old place, after the death of my father to Messrs R. E. BROOKING and A. LACKWELL and made them a deed, some 20 and 30 years ago (see Clark County Court record book) we reserved ¼ of an acre enclosing the family grave yard in which my father and mother, and several of my brothers and sisters are buried, and I afterwards erected tombstones at the heads of my father and mother and built a strong stone wall around them, about 12 by 24 feet square, and I hope my children, and their descendants, will always attend to keeping the same in order and that the present owners of the place (Mr. and Mrs. GRIM) and other neighbors will never suffer them to be violated or the wall removed but keep the same in repair
Leslie Combs

Page No. 2

I claim this general protection for my father and mother - 1st because he was a Revolutionary officer under Washington at the siege of York - 2" because he helped Dan'l BOONE to whip the Indians out of Kentucky - 3rd because my mother was an educated woman and a God-send to all the sick in the vicinity as long as she lived. Her name will be found in Mrs. ELLIOT'S book of remarkable women.

2 Item
I have been a laborer all my life, never an idler or a spendthrift - and if I had hoarded my earnings as many do, I should not now be in want of market money, as I often am, but I have always lived well and entertained strangers, as well as my friends liberally - as long as I had spare money.

But I have allowed my feelings, more than my judgement, to control my investments.

1st. More than thirty years ago when I could have purchased Pennsylvania, Illinois and other state bonds at a very low rate, (I think at less than 25 cents for 100 cents) I invested all my money and all I could borrow, in the war debt of Texas and a large portion of this is still due me, I think over two hundred thousand dollars. The U. S. Government having paid a portion of it some years since. Texas has never paid a cent altho perfectly able to do so.

Page 3

if either of my children die without issue I desire my other children or their descendants to have what is herein devised equally divided only special legacies.

2 Item I have heretofore given more to some of my children than to others according to my means and their necessities and may yet make advances while I live - still after handing over all the special legacies - none of them very large. I desire my house and all the balance of my estate, real and personal to be sold and the proceeds equally divided among my children, first paying all my debts - whether secured by mortgages or not.

Special Legacies
3 Items 1st. my oldest living daughter, Mrs Mary R. MITCHELL having very much attended to my housekeeping for many years - I give her all my furniture with worked cover sofa chairs and which she helped her mother to make also her mother's large wardrobe - my set of gilt tea china and three dozen silver spoons 1/2 of those presented to me many years ago by my friend Col. James MORRESSEY, late member of congress from New York. 1 dozen table (large) spoons - 1 dozen desert spoons and 1 dozen tea spoons (one half of my new spoons)

2nd. I give to her daughter, Margaret, her Grandmother's large dressing glass and to her daughter Mary her Grandmother's bureau and small dressing glass.
Leslie Combs

Page 4

Item 3 I give to my daughter Mrs. Georgette A. WARNER three dozen silver spoons similar to those given to my daughter Mary and presented me by the same friend 2 salt spoons and my honest good old castor.

4 Item I give to my daughter LaBelle two thousand acres of land for which I handed to her husband (Col. S. D. BRUCE) the evidences of title and I hope he gave them to her - My large silver plated broach candle sticks, loaned her many years ago, also one third of all my silver spoons and plated ware not herein specially disposed of I appoint my grandsons to see to that.
Leslie Combs

Item 5 I give to my son, Howard, my sword now in his possession; my saddle, my uniform when captain of artillery, Leslie Combs, and walking canes - The picture of a captain in uniform and General HARRISONS likeness, both in frames in the basement entry - all the books which he doesn't want, to the law library in Lexington and such public documents and pamphlets as he doesn't want, to my nephew, Burke COMBS, of Bremard Texas [Buck COMBS of Bremond, Robertson Co, TX?] - Also the silver pitcher given to me in 1844 by the Whigs of Kings County New York, the friends of Henry CLAY, for whom I made a public address in Brooklyn. This pitcher is not to be sold but handed down to one on his children as an heir to me - and so on.

Leslie Combs
Page 5

I also give him one third of my undivided silver and plated ware -

Item 6 I give to my daughter Mag Leslie one third of my undivided silver and plated ware and her Mother's china flower vases 1 pair on the mantle in the parlor and the portraits of her mother and myself, my son Howard to have the portraits at her death, without issue - They were painted by Jouett.

Item 7 I give to my daughter Elizabeth, one dozen silver forks - my tea set of flowered Dresha China all the books in my library over my office and my small likeness in the dining room, also my new family Bible in common with her brother Leslie also 2 silver butter knives and six small old silver teaspoons given me by my father.

Item 8 I give to my son, Leslie, my silver pitcher presented to me by the Whigs of Delaware in 1840 after my political campaign in that state in favor of General HARRISON as an heirloom never to be sold but to be handed down to some descendant of my blood - also my set of gilt china for the dining and my nice wine glasses and tumblers and one choice pair of bottles and water holders - my marble bust by Bivers and my portrait painted by Frazer in a blue hunting shirt - such as I wore always when addressing
Leslie Combs

Page 6

the people in the political campaign of 1840 and similar to the one worn by General HARRISON when I first saw him at St. Mary's in October, 1812, on his return from the relief of Fort Wayne the likeness is too meager and thin, but if varnished and neatly framed, as I desire to be done will give some idea of my countenance at that time - I wish him also to take and preserve the hunting shirt. I also give him all my undivided books and pamphlets I also give him an old pistol, presented to me on the 19th of December, 1844, the anniversary of the surrender of Cornwallis and which had been recently disinterred by the side of a skeleton within the fort walls, supposed to be that of a British officer killed during the siege - I also give him a block of the frigate constitution which captured the British frigate - Gueriere - early in the War of 1812 - I give him also my china clock.

Item 9 When my last wife came home with me to Kentucky she left a very nice small library at her father's house - I hope her daughter will bring it to her house, so that her brother and sister may have access to it.

Item 10 I wish Howard and Leslie to divide my wearing apparel -(of little value of late years) and dispose of it as they please.
Leslie Combs

Page 7

Item 11 If any of my children desire articles of personal property not herein specially devised I wish my Executors to let it thus be disposed of at a very low rate to them and not publicly sold.

Item 12 I have done everything in my power for my children, my friend, my town, county, state and country, but I desire no ostentation shown at my funeral - Let me be buried in a plain wooden coffin, by the side of my wife and boy in the Lexington cemetery. My other children to be buried there also unless they prefer some other location hereafter.

Item 13 By special request of my brother-in-law, James F. S. BROWNELL, he is buried on my lot near his sister and his widow has erected a very neat monument to him - If she desires it I hope she may be placed by his side, at her death and her child on the other side.

Item 14 During the late terrible Civil War I was knocked down and robbed off my watch, made by Toliras No. 2477 for which I paid two hundred dollars in 1819 or 1820. My name on the outside if ever recovered, I give it to my son Leslie.
Leslie Combs
Witnesses:
J. H. HARRISON
James BRENNAN

Page 8

The foregoing 7 pages contain my will - I appoint my oldest daughter, Mary, Executrix and my son Leslie, Executor and having entire confidence in them do not desire them to give any security.
Witness my hand and seal October 8th, 1875.
Leslie COMBS (Seal)

Lexington, Kentucky July 2nd, 1879
I have perfect confidence in the good sense, sound judgment and honesty of my youngest daughter, Elizabeth, and therefore appoint one of my Executrix's I give her full power to give away to my children and friends, all the furniture saved from my burnt house as they may need and desire, and to sell the remainder at the best price she can get at public or private sale and not to give any security in court on account of it.
Leslie Combs

State of Kentucky August Court
County of Fayette, Sct. August 29, 1881
An instrument of writing with codicil thereto attached purporting to be the last will and testament of General Leslie COMBS, Dec'd of Fayette County, was this day produced to court for probate and proven by the oaths of D. G. FALCONER and J. H. HARRISON to be wholly in the proper handwriting of Testator. Whereupon said instrument of writing with codicil attached is ordered to be recorded as the last will and testament of General Leslie Combs which has been done.

Allie G. Hunt, Clk. By Jno. J. Anglin, D.C.

State of Kentucky,)
     ) Sct.
County of Fayette,)
State of Kentucky,)
     ) Sct.
County of Fayette,)
I, Theo. Lewis, clerk of the County Court of Fayette County, State of Kentucky, and as the custodian of the seal and all records of appertaining to said court, do hereby certify the foregoing to be a true and accurate copy of the last will and testament of Leslie COMBS, deceased, as the same appears of record in my office. IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, witness my hand, the seal of said court, this 21st day of January 1916.
Theo. Lewis
Clerk Fayette County Court
(Seal)


J. D. HUNT GEO. W. DARNALL
HUNT & DARNALL,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
EAST SHORT STREET

Lexington, Ky., Oct 24th 1881
Commission of Pensions
Washington, D.C.

Sir - Gen. Leslie Combs of this place died on the 21st of August last being at the time of his death on the pension rolls as a Captain in the War of 1812. We suppose him to have been entitled to some as can as account of the current quarter at his death, and would be obliged if you sent to us the blanks and instructions for making out the claim -

Yours Respectfully
Hunt & Darnell
(From the National Archives Trust Fund)


APPLICATION FOR A NEW CERTIFICATE

---------------------------------- A blank space is left at the close of applicant's affidavit that the time, place, and manner of the loss or destruction of the original certificate may be set forth.

The pensioner's oath must be supported by the evidence of another person as to identity. The witness must swear that he or she well knows applicant to be the same person described in his or her affidavit, and the magistrate must certify that the deponent is a person of veracity.

When a person acting as agent or attorney for a pensioner loses the certificate, the affidavit of that person, duly authenticated; is also required.

The official character and signature of the officer before whom the affidavits are made must be authenticated by the certificate of the proper officer under his seal of office, and in every instance where the certificate of the certifying officer who authenticates the papers is not written on the same sheet which contains the affidavit, or other paper authenticated, the certificate must be attached thereto by a piece of tape or small ribbon, the ends of which must pass under the seal of office of the certifying officer.

----------------------------------
State of Kentucky County of Franklin, ss.

On this 15th day of December,1865, before the subscriber, a Justice of the Peace for said county, personally appeared Leslie Combs, who on his oath declares that he is the identical Leslie Combs who was formerly a Captain of Kentucky Militia in the Regiment commanded by Colonel William Dudley in the service of the United States; that his name was placed on the pension roll of the State of Kentucky; that he received a certificate of that fact under the signature and seal of the Secretary of War which certificate, on or about the 21 day of November, 1865, near the State house in Frankfort the Clerks office of the Court of Appeals was
Consumed by fire with all its Contents including said Pension Certificate and other private
papers of said Leslie Combs, he, being the Clerk of said Court.

Sworn and subscribed to before me
the day and year aforesaid.
Geo. W. Gwin J.P. Leslie Combs

(From the National Archives Trust Fund)


State of Kentucky County of Franklin, ss.
On this 15th day of December, 1865, before the subscriber, a Justice of the Peace for said county, personally appeared Alexander H. Rennick, who, on his oath, declares that he well knows Leslie Combs who has executed the foregoing affidavit, to be identical pensioner named therein.
A. H. Rennick
Sworn and subscribed to before me the day and year aforesaid.
Geo. W. Gwin J.P.


From The National Archives Trust Fund

24th CONGRESS,
1ST Session. [315]
IN SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES.
--------
APRIL 18, 1836
READ, AND ORDERED TO BE PRINTED
-------
MR. TOMLINSON MADE THE FOLLOWING
REPORT:
The Committee on Pensions, who were instructed, by a resolution of the Senate of the 7th ultimo, to inquire into the expediency and justice of granting a pension to Leslie Combs, of Kentucky, report:
That the documents referred to the committee satisfactorily prove the distinguished zeal and bravery of Leslie Combs, as well as his extraordinary activity as an officer, and his privations and sufferings while in the public service. It appears that, in September, 1812, while the left wing was marching from Fort Wayne to Fort Defiance, Leslie Combs, then about eighteen years old, appeared among the troops, and was promptly attached, by a general order, to the First Regiment of Kentucky volunteer militia. Although no special duty or station was assigned to this patriotic youth, his disposition to be useful was evinced on many occasions in dispensing medicines and hospital stores, and in the performance of kind offices to the sick of the regiment, as well as by the performance of extra services on expeditions sent out for various objects. During the time he remained with the army, his spirit, promptitude, and intelligence, were so exhibited as to produce a favorable influence upon the regiment to which he belonged, and to attack to him public attention and approbation. Such was the confidence placed in this youth, that in January, 1813, he was charged with the conveyance of a most important despatch from General WINCHESTER to General HARRISON, who respectively commanded divisions of the army, which were separated by an extensive wilderness. In the performance of this hazardous service, he and the small body of men with him, were not only exposed to great hardships, but barely escaped with their lives, in consequence of their being overtaken by a violent and protracted snow-storm, while passing over the then trackless and almost impassable region, immediately south of the Miami of the Lake, and denominated the Black Swamp. His exposure to the inclement weather on this duty for several days, with insufficient clothing, no bedding, and but little food, in the opinion of a distinguished physician, has ever since affected his shoulder-joints with a partial anchylosis.

(From The National Archives Trust Fund)

Rev. War Section.
April 29, 1930
Mrs. N. W. Campbell
17 E. Espanola St.
Colorado Springs, Colo.
Madam:

In reply to your letter of the 1" instant, you are advised that from the papers on file in the pension claim, Survivor File No. 9818, it appears that Leslie Combs aged about 18 years was in September 1818, attached to the First Regiment of Kentucky Volunteer Militia and while conveying despatches for General Winchester to General Harrison in January 1813, he was so exposed to inclement weather that it resulted in partial anchylosis of the shoulder joints. In the Spring of 1813, he was appointed Captain of Spies in Colonel William Dudley's Regiment of Kentucky Militia and at the battle of Fort Meigs on May 5, 1813, he was wounded in the left shoulder by a musket ball and was taken prisoner but escaped after running the gauntlet.

He was a resident of Lexington, Kentucky and he was allowed pension on account of the disability resulting from his injuries by Special Act of Congress dated June 15, 1836. He died August 21, 1881. There is no data on file as to his family.
Very respectfully

Commissioner.
From the National Archives Trust Fund


Leslie Combs

Spendthrift has become a renowned Thoroughbred breeding establishment. The controlling figure of this operation comes from one of the most distinguished families of Fayette County --the Leslie COMBSES -- starting with the old general who was a leading citizen and lawyer of Lexington for many years in the early part of the 19th century. His fine residence on Main Street (where the old Lafayette Hotel building now stands) was a showplace. General COMBS was also a horseman, as were many affluent gentlemen of his generation, and was at one time president of the Kentucky Association that established an official race course in Lexington. Another progenitor of Leslie COMBS II, creator of the present day Spendthrift, was Daniel SWIGERT. Neither the General nor SWIGERT could have dreamed of the scope of syndicated breeding operations which COMBS has developed at Spendthrift since 1937. With his son Brownell COMBS II, Leslie COMBS II formed the syndicate that purchased Nashua in 1955.


Lexington Jan 1, 18-8

My Dear Son,

In arranging my letters today in alphabetical order -all---------------- for convenient reference -- I found this school record, which --------------- you -------- ----------- New Year gifts. Showing your general progress & deportment at school.

It may stimulate your doing hereafter to read it -- a ----------------- very honorable to you.

We are all well - with the ground covered with snow after a mild Christmas week.

Mary & Meg have gone to New Orleans on a winter visit to Mary HUNT. Marie is at ----------- -------------. To -----------------only ---------- Marie & Leslie with me. ------------ to all & a Happy New Year.

Yours truly
Leslie COMBS
Col Howard COMBS

P.S. I will write the promise letter in due time for your next elections.

From a letter that Leslie COMBS wrote in his own handwriting.


LESLIE COOMBS

Leslie COOMBS, soldier, born near Boonsboro, Clark County, Kentucky, 28 November 1793; died in Lexington, Kentucky, 21 August, 1881. His father, who served at the Siege of Yorktown, removed from Virginia in 1782, and settled in the wilderness of Kentucky. Leslie, the twelfth child of this pioneer farmer, entered the army at the age of nineteen. In the campaign that ended in the disaster at the River Raisin, he was sent by Gen. Winchester with important despatches to Gen. Harrison. To deliver these he was obliged to traverse a wilderness, occupied by savages and covered with snow, for over a hundred miles, and suffered great privations. On 2 June, 1813, he was commissioned captain of spies in Dudley's regiment of Kentucky Volunteers. He volunteered, with an Indian guide, to carry the intelligence of the approach of Gen. Clay's forces to Gen. Harrison, when the later was besieged in Fort Meigs, but was overpowered in sight of the fort, and escaped to Fort Defiance. He bore a conspicuous part in the defeat of Col. Dudley, on 5 May, and was wounded at Fort Miami. After the war of he studied law, and was admitted to the bar at the age of twenty-three, attaining high rank in the profession. In 1836, he raised, at his own expense, a regiment to aid Texas in her struggle for independence, and was commissioned colonel in August of that year. He was for several terms state auditor, and was many times elected to the legislature. When his old commander, Gen. Harrison, was a candidate for president, Coombs took a prominent part in the canvass. As a stump orator he was unsurpassed. At the beginning of the Mexican War he aided largely in raising volunteers in Kentucky. He was a strong Whig, and earnestly devoted to the Union from the time when the question of secession was first advanced. In 1849, Henry Clay, who placed great trust in Gen. Coombs, wrote to him suggesting that Union meetings should be held throughout Kentucky, enclosing resolutions to be adopted. During the canvass of 1844, he made many speeches in the north and east in support of his friend Clay as a candidate for president. It was in defeating Gen. COOMBS for congress that Gen Breckinridge won his earliest success in public life. Gen. COOMB'S last public office was that of clerk of the Kentucky court of Appeals, to which he was elected by a large majority as the Union candidate in 1860. In opposition to the state guard, organized by Simon B. BUCKER, which was only a school of recruits for the Confederate Army, he organized and armed, in conjunction with Gen. Lovell H. ROUSSEAU, a body of loyal soldiers, who subsequently rendered effective service in the national cause. Gen. COOMBS was one of the pioneers of railroad-building in the west.

(Appleton's Cyclopedia of American Biography, 1888)


ANCESTRY OF MARGARET TROTTER
Margaret Trotter, wife of General Leslie Combs, was the youngest daughter of George and Sarah Trotter.

*** “Said George Trotter was born in Virginia in 1779 and died in Lexington, Kentucky October 13, 1815, age 37. He was the son of Lt. Col. James Trotter, who was a soldier in the Revolution. George entered the Army in 1812, at the beginning of the second war with Great Britain as captain in a volunteer company of dragoons, was wounded in action with the Indians under Col. John B. Campbell on December 18, of that year. He became Lt. Col. of Kentucky Volunteers in 1813 and led a brigade from his State with rank of Brigadier General at the battle of the Thames October, 1813.” ***

(copied from Appleton's Encyclopedia of American Biography, Volume 6, page 162)

The 42nd Regiment was commanded by Col. George Trotter, who served in this campaign as a Brigadier General, he was presented with a drum taken at the battle of the Thames War of 1812. The drum was ornamented with the British coat of arms and the inscription “42nd regiment” before being presented the following was added to the inscription. “presented by General Harrison and General Shelby to Colonel Trotter for the 42nd Regiment, Kentucky Militia, as a testimony of it's patriotism and good conduct, for having furnished more volunteers than any other regiment.”

(The above paragraph is copied from History of Lexington, Kentucky by G. W. Ranch page 266 and 280.)


General Leslie COMBS settled in Lexington in 1818. He was born in Clark County Kentucky, November 28, 1793. His father was a Virginian and his mother a Marylander (might have been from Virginia). During the War of 1812, General COMBS at the age of 19 distinguished himself by his courage and gallantry. In the campaign which ended at Raisin, he was sent with a dispatch from General Winchester to General Harrison and in the execution of his trust traversed the pathless wilderness through snow and water for a 100 miles enduring privations which nearly cost him his life.

In April 1813, he was commissioned Captain of Scouts and was attached to the force under General Green Clay, which had been ordered to the relief of Fort Morgo. Capt. COMBS volunteered with the assistance of an Indian guide and four men to carry news of Clay's approach to Harrison. He succeeded in threading his perilous way through swamps of hostile savages and had arrived in sight of the closely invested Fort, where he was attacked by Indians, one of his men killed, another wounded, he and the rest escaped in a starving condition back to Fort Defiance. Subsequently he took a gallant part in the disastrous defeat of Col. William Dudley, on the 5th of May was wounded, taken prisoner and compelled to run the gauntlet at Fort Miami.

After the war General COMBS settled in Lexington, Kentucky, where he practiced law for half a century.

In 1836, General COMBS raised a regiment for the Southwestern frontier, at the time of the Texas Revolution, as a lawyer, trustee of the Transylvania University, member of the legislature, railroad pioneer, state auditor, and a brilliant and sparkling speaker, General COMBS has stood in high repute among his fellow citizens. After a long and eventful life the Boy Captain of 1812 is still living among us.


Margaret Trotter Combs

DIED -- In this city, on Tuesday, about 4 o'clock, p.m., Mrs. Margaret Combs, consort of General Leslie Combs.

When the messenger of death has summoned a beloved friend to the grave, it becomes us to bear the irreparable loss with fortitude, and bow with resignation to the decree of an inscrutable Providence. But neither the dictates of philosophy, nor the unerring precepts of religion, require forgetfulness of the dead, while nature prompts us to cherish a faithful recollection of the good deeds, and virtuous traits which characterized their career on earth. Such recollections are tributes of affection due to the departed, and sources of consolation to the living.

The subject of this obituary notice was eminently endowed with those moral and intellectual qualities which enable one to discharge worthily the social and domestic duties. She was in truth, a sincere friend, an affectionate wife, a devoted mother. The writer had many opportunities of witnessing her conduct in these various relations, and he can testify that she performed in a most exemplary manner the sacred obligations they impose. He has seen her as she stood by the couch of sickness, and soothed with unwearying kindness the pangs of disease. He has seen her as an affectionate wife attentive to every want, and obedient to every wish of her husband. He has seen her when in the retirement of the family circle, and secluded from the eye of the world, as she gathered her children by her side, and directed their youthful minds to the paths of virtue and of happiness. More than all, the deceased was a humble and devoted Christian. True, she made no public profession of her faith; she was deterred from this course by distrust of her ability to sustain with propriety the Christian character. But for months previous to her last illness, she attended the house of worship whenever her declining health permitted, delighted in the conversation of religious friends, and expressed upon all occasions an anxious solicitude for her eternal salvation. As her frame grew weaker, as the voice of nature warned her of impending dissolution, her whole demeanor changed. A spirit of universal charity breathed through her actions and language, and her soul seemed to feel the shadows of that happy land where we are authorized to believe, it now reposes. Such was the character of Mrs. Combs up to the period of her last illness. The disease which terminated her life was rapid in its progress, and from the commencement preclude every hope of recovery. The day before she expired one of her friends informed her that the hour was drawing near which must inevitable close her earthly career. The intelligence was received with wonderful composure. Calling her afflicted relatives to her dying requests, she entreated them to place their trust in God, and seek an inheritance in heaven. Then, with a firm voice she bade all present an affectionate and final farewell. She reattained her intellect, unclouded to the latest moment of existence, and as in life, so in death, her last prayers were for the welfare of her husband and children. Thus calmly and peacefully her spirit returned to the God that gave it. May we not hope that her soul is enrolled with the ransomed host, of whom the inspired writer has declared: "The lamb which is in the midst of the throne shall feed them, and shall lead them unto the fountains of living waters, and God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes.”

(Found this article in the Combs Family Bible. The clipping was dated January 23, 1884)


DEATH TAKES MRS. W. E. HUDSON
End Came at Bales Hospital, Friday
Morning After a Lingering Illness

Mary Combs Hudson, wife of W. E. Hudson, President of the First National Bank, passed away at the Bales Hospital in Carrollton, Friday morning, June 28th, 1946, after a lingering illness.

Mary Combs Hudson was born in Bethany, Missouri, February 9, 1865. She was the daughter of Howard Tilford and Mary Eleanor Combs of Lexington, Kentucky. She was educated at Sayre Institute and Kentucky University in Lexington, Kentucky. She married William E. Hudson at the Main Street Christian Church in Lexington, Kentucky, November 7, 1889.

Mrs. Hudson was the grand-daughter of General Leslie Combs, noted U.S. Army officer and statesman of Kentucky, and the great grand-daughter of General Benjamin Combs, who fought at the Siege of Yorktown. She also was the granddaughter of General George O. Trotter, a Revolutionary soldier.

She is the mother of two children: Marguerite, (Mrs. William Curry) of Kansas City and Leslie C. Hudson, of Carrollton.

She leaves two grand-daughters, Leslie Combs Bridges and Marguerite G. Curry; one grandson, William Hudson Curry; and one great grand-daughter, Rebecca Ann Bridges, also a brother, R. Leslie Combs of Lexington, Kentucky, two sisters, Mrs. Stephen Yates of Setauket, Long Island, and Mrs. Augusta Kountze of New York City.

Mrs. Hudson was united with the Broadway Christian Church, in Lexington, Kentucky, when 18 years of age.

Funeral services will be held at the Christian Church at 2:30 o'clock Saturday afternoon conducted by the Rev. W. C. Whitehouse. Interment will follow at Oak Hill Cemetery.

Pallbearers will be: D. E. Stanford, Hudson Cooper, John Hudson, Homer Dunham, Arthur C. Leuders, R. M. Rea.

(From The Daily Democrat, Carrollton, Missouri, June 28, 1946)


RESPECTED CITIZEN RITES HELD SATURDAY
A highly respected lady, Mrs. Mary Combs Hudson, passed away at the Bales Hospital at 2:45 a.m., Friday, June 28th. She had been in failing health for the past year and entered the Bales Hospital only a week ago after her condition became critical.

Mary Combs Hudson was born in Bethany, Missouri, February 9, 1865. She was the daughter of Howard Tilford and Mary Eleanor Combs of Lexington, Kentucky. She was educated at Sayre Institute and Kentucky University, Lexington, Kentucky.

Mrs. Hudson was the grand-daughter of General Leslie Combs, noted U.S. Army officer and statesman of Kentucky, and the great grand-daughter of General Benjamin Combs, who fought at the siege of Yorktown. She also was the granddaughter of General George O. Trotter, a Revolutionary soldier.

On November 7, 1889, she was united in marriage to William E. Hudson at the Main Street Christian Church, Lexington, Kentucky. To this union were born two children: Marguerite, (Mrs. William Curry) of Kansas City and Leslie C. Hudson, of Carrollton.

Besides the immediate family she is survived by: two sisters, Mrs. Stephen Yates of Setauket, Long Island, and Mrs. Augusta Kountze of New York City, and a brother, R. Leslie Combs of Lexington, Kentucky. Other survivors are: two grand-daughters, Leslie Combs Bridges and Marguerite G. Curry; one grandson, William Hudson Curry, and one great grand-daughter, Rebecca Ann Bridges.

At the age of eighteen, Mrs. Hudson was united with the Broadway Christian Church, Lexington, Kentucky.

Funeral services were held at the Christian Church at 2:30 o'clock Saturday afternoon conducted by the Rev. W. C. Whitehouse. Interment was made in the Oak Hill Cemetery.

Pallbearers were: D. E. Stanford, Hudson Cooper, John Hudson, Homer Dunham, Arthur C. Leuders, R. M. Rea.

(From The Republican Record Carrollton, Missouri, July 5, 1946)


DEATH OF MRS. MARY COMBS
Died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. W. E. Hudson, on North Folger Street in this city, Saturday evening, December 9, 1911, at 7:30 o'clock, Mrs. Mary E. Combs, aged 75 years, 4 months and 21 days.

Mary Eleanor Loud was the daughter of Richard and Eleanor Loud. She was born in Lexington, Ky., July 18, 1836. She grew to womanhood there, and December 16, 1856, she was married to Howard Tilford Combs.

Soon after their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Combs moved to Missouri, locating in St. Joseph for a brief time, after which they returned to Kentucky. In 1867, they again came to Missouri, this time locating in Carrollton, remaining here until 1880. At this time Mr. Combs became ill, and he was taken back to Kentucky where he died. Mrs. Combs took up her residence in Lexington, Kentucky, after the death of her husband, and continued to reside there until 10 years ago, when she came to Carrollton to make her home with her daughter, Mrs. William E. Hudson. While her home has been here during these last years, Mrs. Combs frequently visited her daughters in New York.

Six months ago Mrs. Combs' health began to fail. Her condition gradually grew worse and for the past three months she had been confined to her bed. Her loved ones realized that her days were numbered, but no one expected the end was so near. Saturday evening there was no noticeable change in her condition. Her daughters were standing at her bedside when she closed her eyes and in a few moments she peacefully passed away.

When a girl yet in her teens Mrs. Combs gave her heart to GOD and united with the Christian Church, and for about 60 years her life had been that of an earnest Christian woman. In her last illness she knew that her days were numbered, but death had no terrors for her and she waited patiently for the coming of the death angel.

She was the mother of seven children, four of whom survive her -- Leslie, of Lexington, Ky.; Mrs. William E. Hudson, of Carrollton; Mrs. Stephen Yates and Mrs. A. F. Kountze, of New York City.

-------------
The funeral of Mrs. Mary Combs was held at the residence of W. E. Hudson, on North Folger Street, Tuesday morning at 10 o'clock. Rev. G. L. Bush conducted the services in the presence of a large number of friends. At the conclusion of the service the body was placed on the electric car and taken to the Wabash noon train, and from thence to Lexington, Ky,. for burial. All four of the living children - Mrs. W. E. Hudson, Leslie Combs, Mrs. Stephen Yates, and Mrs. A. F. Kountze - accompanied the body to its last resting place.

(From The Daily Democrat, Carrollton, Missouri, December 15, 1911)


DEATH OF MRS. MARY E. Combs
Mrs. Mary E. Combs died at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. W. E. Hudson, on North Folger Street, Saturday evening, December 9th, 1911, at 7:30 o'clock, after an illness of several months aged 75 years 4 months 21 days. Although she had been ill for some time and her condition such as to make recovery improbable the end came as a surprise and shock to her daughters, Mrs. Hudson and Mrs. Kountze, who were with her at the time.

Mrs. Combs whose maiden name was Loud was born in Lexington, Kentucky, July 18th, 1836, where she grew to womanhood and where on December 16, 1856, she was married to Howard Tilford Combs. Soon after their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Combs came to Missouri but soon returned to Kentucky, coming again, however, to Missouri in 1867 and locating in Carroll County where they remained until 1880 when they returned to Kentucky, Mr. Combs only living a short time.

For several years Mrs. Combs has made her home in Carrollton with her daughter, Mrs. Hudson, where she soon gathered round her the friends of former years and by her culture and winning personality became a favorite in church and social life.

Of her seven children four survive her viz: -Leslie Combs, of Lexington, Kentucky, Mrs. W. E. Hudson, of Carrollton and Mrs. Stephen Yates and Mrs. A. F. Kountze, of New York.

The funeral services were held at her late home on North Folger Street, conducted by Rev. G. L. Bush, of the Christian Church, after which the remains were taken to Lexington, Kentucky, for burial beside her husband.

The son and three daughters accompanied the remains to Kentucky.

(From The Republican Record, Carrollton, Missouri, December 14, 1911)


MARRIED
Married, at the residence of the bride's father, by the Reverend Edward F. Berkley, Rector of Christ Church (Episcopal creed), in Lexington, Kentucky. Miss Mary Eleanor LOUD, daughter of Richard LOUD, Esquire to Howard COMBS, son of General Leslie COMBS, on Tuesday at 12 o'clock noon, December 16, 1856.


From Mary Eleanor's diary.

NEWSPAPER CHANGES. -- Both Carrollton papers changed hands last week. We see that one former follow citizen, Capt. H. T. COMBS, is editor and proprietor of the Record. Mr. COMBS has had considerable experience as editor and will fill the place with credit and ability. Capt. COMBS states that he will help to sustain the incoming state administration of Gov. Brown, that he will advocate a new convention, by will oppose any ousting ordinance. He was elected county clerk of Carroll County at the late election and does not want to vacate. We wish our old friend prosperity with his new Record.

----------------

H. T. COMBS has purchased the interest of J. H. Turner in The Carrollton Record, and will try to unite the Republican party pm a broader basis. A broader basis may be necessary for those who have like Mr. Combs, just been elected to office; but we imagine that, in the present state of affairs in this State, the present basis will be broad enough for most Republicans. And if the position taken by the Record be true, the Democrats will probably attend to Mr. Combs before his basis gets so broad as to be inconvenient.

(From newspaper articles found in Minnie Combs Hudson's scrapbook)


HOWARD TILFORD Combs
The news arrived in town last week that Col. Howard Tilford COMBS died at Lexington, Kentucky, July 22, aged about 45 years.

Col. Combs was well known to the citizens of Carroll County, as a pleasant, sociable, gentleman, a first rate businessman. He held the office of County Clerk for four years, having been elected as a liberal in 1870. He has many friends in this county who will regret to hear of his death in the prime of life, and their sympathies will go with the afflicted family.

(From The Carrollton Record, July 31. 1880)


CAPTAIN HOWARD T. COMBS
Intelligence reached this city last week of the death of Captain Howard T. Combs, which occurred at Lexington, Kentucky, on the 16th, ult. (meaning in the week preceding this week) Capt. Combs resided in Carrollton several years, and has many friends here who will regret to hear of his demise. For several weeks he had been ill, but was thought to be improving up to a few moments before his death. On that morning, a letter from his wife states, he had eaten a hearty breakfast and expressed himself as feeling better than usual. Returning from a temporary absence from the room, Mrs. Combs was horrified to find the Captain dying, and in a few minutes all was over.

(The Daily Democrat, Carrollton, Missouri, 31 July 1880)


57th Reg't Enrolled Mo. Militia.
Combs, Howard T.
Rank Adjutant
Enrolled and organized_______________________186_______
Where ____________________________________________, Mo.
Ordered into active service Oct. 10, 1864_ Where Bethany, Mo.
By whom Col. Shanklin
Relived from duty Oct. 31 , 1864 By whom Col. Shanklin
Ordered into active service ________________, 186______
Where _________________________________________________
By whom _______________________________________________
Relived from duty __________________________, 186______
By whom _______________________________________________
Remarks: Comd. Adjutant Aug 6, 1864. rank from Aug 6, 64. Vacated March 12, 1865.
_______________________________________________________
(stamp)
MISSOURI STATE ARCHIVES
CERTIFICATE OF WAR
union


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