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Staffordshire, or Stafford, an inland county; bounded, on the NW, by Cheshire; on the NE, by Derbyshire; on the E, by Derbyshire and Leicestershire; on the SE, by Warwickshire; on the S, by Worcestershire; on the W, by Salop. Its outline is somewhat ellipsoidal, with the longer axis extending N and S. Its boundary line, along part of the NW, is the river Dane; along the NE, is the river Dove; along most of the E, is the rivers Dove, Trent, and Tame; along small part of the W, is the river Tern; and along most other parts, is entirely artificial. Its greatest length is 54 miles; its greatest breadth is 35 miles; its circuit is about 210 miles; and its area is 728,468 acres.

Imperial Gazetteer of England and Wales. John Marius Wilson. 1870-72


Staffordshire, England is where we find the earliest records of the Archdale Families of Staffordshire, London and Oxfordshire. The primary source for Archdale records is extractions by Archdale Researcher Peter Archdale from the Archdale Memoirs. Very few Combe records have been located as yet (Staffordshire not yet actively researched), and thus far, the Combes are primarily the result of a quick skim of Burkes… and a few IGI entries (all pre-1700 extracted).

Combs &c. Records by Hundred and Parish in which Combs and Associated Families have been found thus far

To learn more about medieval terms for land see the ENGLAND: Land from Medieval to Present Day.


Unknown Parish


bef 1593 Richard STRATFORD (s/o Richard and Frances KERKEBY Stratford, g/so Robert and Anne ATWOOD Stratford, ggs/o Nicholas ATWOOD of Staffordshire) married Margaret, dau. of --COMBE, and had issue, a son, Henry, who m. Abigail, dau. of William COKE. (From Burke's Family Records by Ashworth P. Burke, 1897, p 559, 560, Morgan-Stratford Lineage (See Combs &c. Visitations for complete article) Provided by Combs Researcher Vince Griffin who adds: "Time frame for the above three generations prior to 1640.")

Were Richard STRATFORD (III) and Margaret COMBE of Staffordshire like the ATWOODS, or of Walford, Gloucestershire? Also note marriage of Richard WARRE of Hestercombe to Joan, d/o John ATWOOD, their son, Richard WARRE having m Joan COMBE, d/o JOHN COMBE of Dalwood, Dorset.


Baswich, a parish in the eastern division of the hundred of Cuttlestone, county of Stafford, comprising the chapelry of Acton-Trussel, and the townships of Baswich, Bednall, Brockton, Milford, and Walton, and containing 1376 inhabitants, of which number, 559 are in the township of Baswich, 2-1/4 miles (E.S.E.) from Stafford. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the peculiar jurisdiction of the Prebendary of Whittington and Baswich in the Cathedral Church of Lichfield, endowed with £400 private benefaction, and £2000 parliamentary grant. The Rev. William INGE was patron in 1817. The church is dedicated to the Holy Trinity. The Staffordshire and Worcestershire canal passes through the parish.

"Acton Trussell [abt 3 miles south of Stafford], a chapelry in the parish of Baswich, eastern division of the hundred of Cuttlestone, 3 miles (N.N.E.) from Penkridge, containing, with the township of Bednall, 562 inhabitants. The living, a perpetual curacy, is a peculiar, belonging to the Prebendary of Whittington and Baswich, in the cathedral church of Lichfield. G. MOLLINEUX, Esq. was patron in 1806. The chapel is dedicated to St. James. The Staffordshire and Worcestershire canal passes through this place, and the river Trent flows near it.

"Bednall, a chapelry, and a joint township with Acton-Trussel, in the parish of Baswich, eastern division of the hundred of CUTTLESTONE, county of STAFFORD, 4 miles (N. E. by N.) from Penkridge, containing, with Acton-Trussel, 562 inhabitants. The living is a perpetual curacy, endowed with £600 royal bounty, and a peculiar belonging to the Prebendary of Baswich in the Cathedral Church of Lichfield. The chapel is dedicated to All Saints." (Lewis, 1831)

1415 The Plea Rolls, De Banco, Trinity, 3 Henry V. John ARCHDALE was living at Acton Trussel, about three miles south of Stafford during the reign of Henry V., AD 1415 mention him being sued (along with others) for damage to property. (Researcher Peter Archdale from the Archdale Memoirs)


Stafford (City)

The following 1535 record appears to be the earliest one specific to John Archdale (Archedalle) and to Staffordtown where he is known to have resided. We do not know much of John Archdale who is the earliest ancestor we have traced back of this family that intermarried in London with a branch of COMBS. This would be in reference to Margaret Archdale, John's granddaughter by his son Thomas, who married John Combe of London. I believe this to be part of the ancestry of Archdale Combe of Old Rappahannock and Stafford Counties, Virginia.

10 July 1535 FILE [no title] - ref. D938/224
[from Scope and Content] Prior and convent have further granted, sette, and to firm have letten [?one] pasture called the Raylles sette lying and being under Kynston Hyll next unto the pasture of John Archedale unto the within named Richard Hamersley, his heirs and assignes, yielding and paying to the said prior and convent 10s. (?) of lawful money of England at the feasts within written. And the said Richard Homersley and his heirs and assigns to occupy the said pastures to their meesses advantage being no displeasure to the house [....] with in written.

The record citation found through A2A is posted as follows:
Staffordshire and Stoke-on-Trent Archive Service, Staffordshire Record Office: St. Thomas' Priory, Stafford. The contents of this catalogue are the copyright of Staffordshire and Stoke-on-Trent Archive Service, Staffordshire Record Office Rights in the Access to Archives database are the property of the Crown, © 2001-2006

Submitted by Denise Mortorff

ST THOMAS' PRIORY, STAFFORD Catalogue Ref. D938

1540-1551 John ARCHDALE served as Bailiff of Stafford in 1540; and in 1541 as Chamberlain of Stafford; in 1546 as Bailiff of Stafford again; and in 1551 as Chamberlain of Stafford again. (Borough of Stafford, Researcher Peter Archdale & Archdale Memoirs)

2 Jun ca 1543 "Depositions taken 2nd June and other days ensuing, 34 Henry VIII [ca 1543], before John Ap HARRY, clerk, William HORNE, William TIRRY, John SAVAGE, and John ARCHDALE by virtue of the King's commission. (Extracted by Combs Researcher Joe Kendalll from COLLECTION FOR A HISTORY OF STAFFORDSHIRE. NEW SERIES. Vol. X. Printed in London. 1907, p. 54)

JK Notes: This deposition was in reference to "The Court of the Star Chamber." Names referenced in the beginning of the depositions include PHILLIPS, CHILTON, DORINGTON, DAMPORT, PIKIN with respect to a place called the "Grene near Stafford.".

18 May 1557 Stafford. Administration of estate of John ARCHDALE of the parish of St. Mary, Stafford, Staffordshire granted to Anne the relict [widow] and executrix, etc. Exec. "testi Indent. renuncioe admi'stracie jurat et het Ad exhend Inventar citra fm sti Michis Arch p'x etc." [There was a will, apparently not extant. Did she renounce administration? To whom?] (Archdale Memoirs, p. 87)

30 Nov 1577 Stafford, Saint Mary. Christened: Abraham COMBE, s/o Adam and Mary COMBE (IGI Entry, B: 20 Nov 1965 LANGE Ba: P010221, E: 18 Feb 1966 LANGE So: 873648, SP: 28 Oct 1969 LANGE Pr: 0472492, film not yet read).

Note: This was the only early City of Stafford record, but other later records not yet extracted (1700s and 1800s - no 1600s).


Martson (Marston? If so, 2.48 mi. north of City of Stafford and 5.62 northwest of Acton Trussell)

1633-5 Visitation of London, Palmer Family. Thomas PALMER of Martson in Staffordshire and Joane FOX of Hopton, Staffordshire, parents of (1) Robert PALMER of Hill, Bedfordshire; (2) John PALMER, Rector of Church of Stafford ("very aged withough issue") and (3) William PALMER of London, Merchant, living in 1634, h/o Barbara, daughter of Thomas ARCHDALE of London, by whom: Archdale PALMER, eldest son, William PALMER and John PALMER.

Thomas ARCHDALE, s/o John and Anne ARCHDALE of Stafford, Staffordshire, married (1) Mary CLIFTON, by whom the above Barbara ARCHDALE Palmer, Sarah, wife of Ady SARE of the Inner Temple, London, and Margaret, wife of John COMBE of St. Mary Aldermanbury, London where also are found the ARCHDALE-PALMERS.


Gnosall (6.48 miles northwest of Acton Trussell) Gnosall, a parish in the western division of the hundred of Cuttlestone, county of Stafford, comprising the townships of Cowley, Gnosall, Knightley, and a part of Apeton, Alstone, Brough, and Rule, and the hamlet of Moreton, and containing 2671 inhabitants, of which number, 1038 are in the township of Gnosall, 6½ miles (W.S.W.) from Stafford. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the peculiar jurisdiction of the Lord of the Manor of Gnosall, endowed with £400 parliamentary grant, and in the patronage of the Bishop of Lichfield and Coventry. The church, dedicated to St. Lawrence, has lately received an addition of three hundred free sittings, the Incorporated Society for the enlargement of churches and chapels having granted £150 towards defraying the expense. It was given by King Stephen to the church of Lichfield, but afterwards became a royal free chapel, and had an establishment of secular canons; in the reign of Henry VIII., the Bishop of Lichfield and Coventry was titular dean, to which office no profits were attached, and there were four prebendaries, viz., of Chiltrenhall, Baverley-hall, Mordhall, and Suckerhall; the first valued at £14. 6. 8., and the others at £11 each per annum. Edward Cartwright, in 1653, enfeoffed to trustees a cottage and ground for the education of fourteen children; the income is £21. 4. 6. per annum. Five others are instructed by a schoolmistress for £2 per annum, the gift of Alice Hudson in 1660.

The parish of Gnosall also includes the following townships-hamlets:

APETON, a township in the chapelry of Gnosall, western division of the hundred of Cuttlestone, county of Stafford, containing 59 inhabitants.

COWLEY, a township in the parish of Gnosall, western division of the hundred of Cuttlestone, [p.501] county of Stafford, 5 miles (E.) from Newport, containing 498 inhabitants.

KNIGHTLEY, a township in the parish of Gnosall, western division of the hundred of Cuttlestone, county of Stafford, 3 miles (S.S.W.) from Eccleshall, containing 322 inhabitants.

MORETON, a hamlet in the parish of Gnosall, western division of the hundred of Cuttlestone, county of Stafford, 4 miles (E.S.E.) from Newport, containing 754 inhabitants. It is in the honour of Tutbury, duchy of Lancaster, and within the jurisdiction of a court of pleas held at Tutbury every third Tuesday, for the recovery of debts under 40s. (Lewis, 1831)

30 Oct 1694 Gnosall, Staffordshire, England. Christened: Thomas CUMMES, s/o George and Dorothy CUMMES (IGI entry, Ba: P010071, So: 873641, Pr: 0537064, film not yet read)


Tixall (3-12/ miles east of Acton Trussell) Tixall, a parish in the southern division of the hundred of Pirehill, county of Stafford, 3-3/4 miles (E. by S.) from Stafford, containing 198 inhabitants. The living is a discharged rectory, in the archdeaconry of Stafford, and diocese of Lichfield and Coventry, rated in the king's books at £8. 0. 8., and in the patronage of Sir Clifford Constable, Bart. The church is dedicated to St. John the Baptist. There is a Roman Catholic chapel in the parish. Immense quantities of freestone are quarried in the neighbourhood of Tixall Hall, which fine old mansion was built of that found upon the spot. Much of it has been used also in the construction of the bridges and locks of the Staffordshire and Worcestershire canal, which passes through the parish, and of the Trent and Mersey canal in the vicinity, the stone being peculiarly adapted for resisting the action of water. (Lewis, 1831)

20 Jun 1699 Tixall, Staffordshire, England. Married: Ralph COMBES and Elizabeth FARMER (IGI entry, Ba: E047942, So: 421605, film not yet read).


Longdon LONGDON, a parish in the southern division of the hundred of OFFLOW, county of Stafford, 4 miles [p.163] (N.W. by N.) from Lichfield, containing 1115 inhabitants. The living is a vicarage, in the peculiar jurisdiction of the Prebendary of Longdon in the Cathedral Church of Lichfield, rated in the king's books at £5. 5., and in the patronage of the Prebendary, but, after his demise, in that of the Bishop of Lichfield and Coventry. The church, dedicated to St. James, has lately received an addition of one hundred sittings, of which sixty-four are free, the Incorporated Society for the enlargement of churches and chapels having contributed £30 towards defraying the expense. There is a place of worship for Independents. Several small bequests have been made for the instruction of children. St. Mary's almshouses, founded by Mrs. Jane Cotton, are ten in number, nine of which are inhabited by poor women, each of whom receives three shillings and sixpence weekly; the tenth is occupied by a schoolmistress, who instructs twelve girls and five boys. A court leet is held twice a year by the lord of the manor. Indications of coal are observable here, but none has been raised. The Trent and Mersey canal passes about two miles northward of the church. At Castle Ring, a point in the Marquis of Anglesey's park at Beaudesert, are the remains of a British encampment. The Society of Friends have a very ancient burial-ground at Gentle Shaw, in this parish.

8 Oct 1666 Old Rappahannock County, Virginia. Deeds, Wills, Book 5:109. Robert WALTON of Rappa. By vertue of Letter of Attorney from Nicholas ANDREWS of Longdon Gent bearing date 15 Oct 1663… in consideration of 400 lbs. Of Tobacco… to John PAYNE of County of Rappa. 560 A of land by the within mentioned formerly sold and conveied to the said Nicholas ANDREWS by the said John PAYNE … he the said John PAYNE paying and performing the Rents and services thereof due… this 8th day of October 1666. s/Robert WALTON. In presence of John PAYNE, Jr., Charles MUMFORD, Richard PAYNE, Abraham COMB, Thomas PARKER. (Deed Abstracts of Old Rappahannock County, Virginia, Part I of1672-1676, Ruth and Sam Sparacio, Antient Press, McLean, VA, 1989)

Notes: This may not be a Staffordshire record since Longdons are also found in Shropshire and Worcestershire, plus a second Longdon is in Staffs:

Longdon, a township in that part of the parish of Leek which is in the northern division of the hundred of Totmonslow, county of Stafford, 1 mile (W. by S.) from Leek, containing 350 inhabitants. (Lewis, 1831)

See Also Archdale-Combs Families of England re ANDREWS/PALMER of Middlesex; See Also George COMBS of Henrico County, Virginia re William PARKER


Newcastle Under Lyme (Lyne) (18 mi. northwest of Acton Trussell), a borough, market town, and parish, having separate jurisdiction, though locally in the northern division of the hundred of Pirehill, county of Stafford, 16 miles (N.N.W.) from Stafford, and 149 (N.W. by N.) from London, containing 7031 inhabitants. This was a place of some note before the Conquest, though known by a different name; its present appellation being derived from a castle built here by Edmund, Earl of Lancaster, in the reign of Henry III., a former edifice, called Chesterton castle, having fallen into decay; and the descriptive affix, "under Lyne, or Lyme, denotes its proximity to a forest of that name, serving also to distinguish it from Newcastle in Northumberland. The town is situated on a small branch of the river Trent, on the great road from Birmingham and London to Liverpool and Manchester, and consists of two principal and several smaller streets, which are paved (the foot-paths with brick), and lighted with gas, under the provisions of an act passed in 1819: the inhabitants are supplied with water by means of pipes leading from water-works in the town, which is raised by an engine; the houses are mostly ancient. There is a small theatre, also a concert and assembly room; and the races, held annually in the first week in August, on a course near the town, are well attended. The manufacture of hats is very extensive, and is conducted under an incorporated company of Felt-makers; and silk-throwing, cotton-spinning, tanning, malting, the manufacture of copperas, white lead, and paper, are also carried on: considerable business is done in the corn trade, and in the vicinity are some iron-works. Its commercial prosperity is much promoted by the neighbouring potteries, which occupy a district nearly eight miles in extent. A branch canal from this town, about four miles in length, joins the Trent and Mersey canal at Stoke; and another to Apedale is used chiefly for the conveyance of coal hither. The markets are on Monday and Saturday, and on every alternate Monday is a great cattle market: fairs are held on Shrove-Monday, for cattle; Easter-Monday, Whit-Monday, and July 14th, for wool; Monday after September 13th, and the first Monday in November.

The first charter of incorporation was granted in the 19th of Henry III., and was confirmed by subsequent monarchs: that now in force is dated in the 32nd of Elizabeth, and is a confirmation of all former grants, with several additions. Under it the corporation consists of a mayor, two bailiffs, and twenty-four capital burgesses, who form a common council, by which body the mayor and bailiffs are annually elected on the Tuesday next after Michaelmas-day; assisted by a recorder, town clerk, and two serjeants at mace; the two former enjoy the office for life. By a confirmation of this charter, in the fifteenth of Charles II., the members of the common council are empowered to elect annually from among themselves two justices of the peace, who, with the mayor, hold general sessions for the borough quarterly, but have no power to try capital offenders. A court of record is held every three weeks, for the recovery of debts not exceeding £50; the mayor and bailiffs are the presiding officers. Courts leet and baron are likewise held every three weeks. This borough has returned members to parliament from the 27th of Edward III.: the right of election is in the resident freemen, in number about eight hundred: the mayor is the returning officer. The freedom is obtained by birth (being extended to all the sons of resident sworn burgesses), by apprenticeship within the borough, by gift of the common council, and by purchase.

Newcastle was formerly a chapelry in the parish of Stoke upon Trent. The living is a rectory not in charge, in the archdeaconry of Stafford, and diocese of Lichfield and Coventry, and in the patronage of the Society for purchasing livings. The church, dedicated to St. Giles, was rebuilt in 1720: it is a modern edifice of brick, with a very ancient tower of red sandstone. A new church, or chapel, containing six hundred and seventy-one free sittings, was completed in 1828, the parliamentary commissioners having granted £4400 towards defraying the expense, the remainder being raised by subscription: it is intended as a chapel of ease during the incumbency of the present rector, after which the right of presentation will belong to the Society for purchasing livings. There are places of worship for Baptists, Independents. Methodists of the New Connexion, and Primitive and Wesleyan Methodists. The free grammar school originated in a benefaction from Richard Cleyton, Esq., in 1602, augmented by a bequest from John Cotton, and various other charitable contributions; the entire annual income is about £90: it is free for all the sons of burgesses, and poor inhabitants of the borough: the school-house has been rebuilt. An English school was founded, in 1704, by means of a bequest from the Rev. Edward ORME, for the instruction of the children of the poor in reading, writing, and arithmetic; the income is about £160 per annum, and there is a residence for the master, who instructs fifty children. About fifteen or twenty children are taught by a schoolmistress, for a salary of £8 per annum, paid by the corporation: there is likewise a National school. Almshouses for twenty poor aged widows were erected and endowed under the will of Christopher MONK, Duke of Albemarle, dated July 4th, 1687. John GOODWIN, an eminent Nonconformist divine and controversialist, was born here about 1593: and Elijah FENTON, the coadjutor of POPE in his translation of Homer's Odyssey, was also a native of the town. Newcastle confers the title of duke on the family of CLINTON.

12 Nov 1612 Newcastle Under Lyme, Staffordshire, England. Christened: Matheus COUMS, s/o Jarvis COUMS (IGI entry (film not read), Ba: P010291, So: 873642, Pr: 0472205)


Codsall (1.96 northwest of Tettenhall Regis, 4 mi. northwest of Wolverhampton; 3.77 mi. from each of Albrighton near Tong, Bonningale, Donington and Boscobel, all in Salop (Shropshire); 7.5 mi. northwest of Bentley, Warwickshire; and 8.89 northwest of Dudley, Worchestershire). "...a parish in the southern division of the hundred of Seisdon, county of Stafford, 5 miles (N.W.) from Wolverhampton, containing 659 inhabitants. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the jurisdiction of the royal peculiar court of Tettenhall, endowed with £600 private benefaction, £400 royal bounty, and £1500 parliamentary grant. Sir J. WROTTESLEY, Bart. was patron in 1805. The church is dedicated to St. Nicholas. A school was founded in 1716, by Dorothy DERBY, with an endowment, increased by a subsequent bequest from Margaret Somerford in 1730 to £3.3. per annum, for teaching children of this parish." (Lewis, 1831)

1 Jun 1588 Codsall, Staffordshire, England. Married: Alyce CUMBE and PARKER [sic] (IGI entry (film not read), B: 4 Nov 1982 NAUVO Ba: E012171, E: 20 Nov 1982 NAUVO So: 924486, Pr: 0883978)

Note: In addition to the above IGI records, there is a Mary CUME entry as wife of Walter BOSLEY, with an estimated birth year for her of 1653 in Staffordshire. (F#: 177929, @, P#: 397, O#: 15361, film not yet read, no parish given).


Swinnerton, a parish in the northern division of the hundred of Pirehill, county of Stafford, 3-1/2 miles (W.N.W.) from Stone, containing 832 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, in the archdeaconry of Stafford, and diocese of Lichfield and Coventry, rated in the king's books at £10. 2. 6., and in the patronage of the Rev. Christopher DODSLEY. The church is dedicated to St. Mary. The river Sow forms the boundary between this parish and Eccleshall. (Lewis, 1831)

9 Ric. II [1386] E 329/198. St. John's Hospital, Leicester to John del COMBE, Parson of Swynnerton, and others: Quitclaim of the lands, etc., in Frisby by Galby they had at fee-form of the demise of Trentham Priory: Leicsestershire. (Combs &p;c. of the PRO, Series E, Exchequer: Augmentation Office: Ancient Deeds, Series BS)

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