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Maury Co, Tennessee was established in 1807 from Williamson County, Tennessee, and initially encompassed a significant segment of middle Tennessee as far south as the now-Alabama border. In 1809, Giles Co was established from Maury, and in 1817, Lawrence from Hickman and Maury. In 1836, Marshall Co was established from Bedford, Lincoln and Maury; and in 1843, Lewis was established from Hickman, Maury, Lawrence and Wayne.


1807-1809 Resided in Maury Co, TN: John COMBS (s/o John & Sarah MABRY Combs) & Jean JACKSON (d/o John & Margaret UNKNOWN Jackson), according to their grandson, Carlton COMBS who wrote: "…In three weeks after their marriage (15 Jul 1807 Grainger County, Tennessee) they packed 3 horses, mounted them and started for the wilderness part of the state and located in a cane brake on Duck River, in what is now Maury County and near where Columbia is now situated. Built a log cabin in the thick woods or cane brakes full of Indians, bear, panthers, wolves, wildcats etc. etc. and commenced work to open farm land and make a beginning at the first end of what they doubtless contemplated a long life. But unexpected difficulties arose. Indians were not only too thick but made themselves entirely too familiar with anything and everything about the premises, to which they took a fancy, especially in the lines of provisions. The immense number of wild monsters of the woods and cane brakes where the cane grew 30 feet high and so thick that a bear could not be seen a whole rod in the thicket, had their influence on the young pair who were nearly alone in the wilderness (so far as white neighbors were concerned, and very naturally awakened some apprehension for their safety. To add to their troubles their stock of provisions gave out. This made it necessary for father to go somewhere where there was a settlement of white human beings to procure supplies. The nearest place to them at that time, as I suppose, of the desired sort was Huntsville, [Madison Co] Alabama. Nashville [Davidson County, Tennessee] is nearer now but I think it probably at time were there no Nashville as Knoxville [Knox Co] was then the capitol of Tenn. At any rate his went to Huntsville, leaving mother in this wilderness place with only a niece (Sarah, daughter of Uncle Phillip COMBS) with her.

After father left, the Indians became more bold and more aggressive and although the doors were kept securely pinned bolted and barred, the Indians on one occassion undertook to batter them down. But whether to scare the inmates or for plunder, I do not remember that I ever knew. But they did not remain here very long time for soon they found a home in or near Huntsville and while there on the 17th day of June, 1809 as before stated, I first saw light. So you can see I am a native Alabamian, by accident. Had I have a choice in the matter, I would have preferred to have been born a native of Tenn. where seven brothers and sister were born, but you will understand that I was not consulted. At my birth my father was only 19 1/2 years old, just how long they remained in Alabama, I am not prepared to say. They left there, however, before I can remember. Before the birth of the second child who was 2 years 1 month and 24 days younger than myself and who ws born on or near the premises where they built their cabin in the cane brake and near Columbia. After the birth of the second child, Milton Crawford [COMBS], and before the birth of the third child, Jefferson Lee [COMBS, b ca 1814], they pulled stakes very much opposed to the wishes of my Mother and crawfished back to Tenn. and lived in Jefferson and Grainger Counties until 1828…"

Notes: Although Carlton makes no mention of other COMBS who may have resided in Maury County, Tennessee, it is possible that some of the following (this county not yet researched) may have been kin to the Combs-Mabry Families.


1816 Maury Co, Tennessee Tax Lists

William COMBS

(Sistler's Index to Early East Tennessee Tax Lists)


1820 Maury Co, TN Census Index

P. 24
COMBS, …

P. 27
COMBS, William 111201-53110

P. 43
COMB [sic], Lyps 210010-51010

P. 44
ORR, James 400010-11010

P. 069
RIDGES, Raichel
RIDGEN [sic], William

Notes: The above is per Bentley Index. Another source (AAI, from whom stats obtained; ergo, may be incorrect) lists Lyps COMB as Hyer COMB. No Combs are listed on the 1830 Maury Census. See James ORR and Phillip and John COMBS and Orr-Combs Families of Grainger County, Tennessee, children of John & Sarah MABRY Combs. Not known if RIDGES/RIDGEN was actually RIDGE (See Surry Co, North Carolina)


31 Aug 1820 Maury County, Tennessee Marriages. COMBS, Berthina married DUKE, Allen (Extracted by Combs Researcher Debi Kendrick from Ancestry On-Line)

Notes: No Allen DUKE was listed in either the 1820 or 1830 Maury County, Tennessee Census, although a number of other DUKES were. One Allen DUKE is found on the 1830 Humphreys County, Tennessee census adjacent an Edward COMBS and near to other Combs. See also Wilkes Co GA re Combs-Duke Connections that were probably closely related to the Combs-Mabry Families.


1830 Maury Co, TN Census

No COMBS by Surname

P. 362
L12 John SMITH 2212101-1010001
L13 David JOHNSON 01110001-0211001
L16 Jacob THOMPSON 312000001-00022001
L22 David COPELAND 10001-10011
L24 Francis MABERRY 21101-120001

(1830 Middle TN Census, Sistler and Associates, Nashville, TN)

Notes: See David & Nancy COMBS Copeland marriage of Knox County, Tennessee in 1824, and John and Harriet COMBS Smith marriage in same county in 1822. Not known if same; however, the close proximity of Francis MABERRY [a.k.a. MABRY] to David COPELAND may indicate a Combs-Mabry relationship (See Above)


Important: All Records collected for this county may not have been added here as yet. See also the Combs Research List Archives

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