Combs &c. Research
Combs &c. Families of
Sussex, England

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Sussex, a maritime county, is bounded on the west by Hampshire, on the north by Surrey, on the north-east and east by Kent, and on the south by the English Channel... comprising an area of upwards of one thousand four hundred and sixty-three square miles. Lewis' 1830 Topographical Dictionary states: "William, Duke of Normandy, in his invasion of England, made his descent upon this coast, landing his army in Pevensey bay, where he arrived with a fleet of nine hundred sail, on September 29th, 1066. On the 14th of October the Saxon and the Norman armies came to an engagement at a place then called Epiton, but which, in commemoration of this victory, has ever since been called Battle. Thence William marched along the coast, north-eastward, to Dovor. In 1087, or 1088, William II. invested Pevensey castle, where the rebellious Bishop of Baieux had taken refuge, the garrison in which, after a siege of six weeks, was compelled by famine to surrender. On May 14th, 1264, the decisive battle between the forces of Henry III. and those of his barons, under Simon de Montfort, was fought near Lewes, in which the king and his son, Prince Edward, were made prisoners...."

Among the earliest Combes of Sussex were Hugo de CUMBE and his brother, Normanno de CUMBE, who appear in the records of Sussex as early as 1135. See Early Combes of Sussex.


Combs &c. Parishes* in Sussex
Parishes in the Rape of Bramber, West Sussex

Coombes
Lancing
Shipley
Steyning
Upper Beeding

Parishes in the Rape of Hastings

Hastings

See also Catsfield

Parishes in the Rape of Pevensey

Hundred of Flexborough:
Chiddingly

Hundred of Shiplake:
Seaford

Parishes in the Rape of Chichester

Hundred of Box and Stockbridge:
Chichester



Rape not yet known

Arundel (and some Angmering)
Buxted (near Chiddingly)
Pyecombe (near Upper Beeding)
More about Sussex Divisions

From Lewis' 1830 Topographical Dictionary of England (paraphrased): "Sussex is co-extensive with the diocese of Chichester, in the province of Canterbury, and is divided into the two archdeaconries of Chichester and Lewes, the former containing the deaneries of Arundel, Boxgrove, Chichester, Midhurst, and Storrington, and, locally that of Pagham; the latter those of Dallington, Hastings, Lewes, and Pevensey, and, locally that of South Malling; all the parishes comprised in the exempt deaneries of Pagham and South Malling, with those of All Saints at Chichester, and St. Thomas in the Cliffe at Lewes, are in the peculiar jurisdiction of the Archbishop of Canterbury. The total number of parishes is three hundred, of which one hundred and fifty-seven are rectories, one hundred and twenty-seven vicarages, and the remainder, with the exception of three, which have both a rectory and a vicarage, perpetual curacies....

The great civil divisions are called rapes, a term peculiar to this county: they are six in number, viz., Arundel, comprising the hundreds of Arundel, Avisford, Bury, Poling, Rotherbridge, and West Easwrith; Bramber, comprising those of Brightford, Burbeach, East Easwrith, Fishergate, Patching, Singlecross, Steyning, Tarring, Tipnoak, West Grinstead, and Windham and Ewhurst; Chichester, those of Aldwick, Bosham, Box and Stockbridge, Dumpford, Easebourne, Manhood, and Westbourn and Singleton; Hastings, those of Baldslow, Battle, Bexhill, Foxearle, Goldspur, Gostrow, Guestling, Hawkesborough, Henhurst, Netherfield, Ninfield, Shoyswell, and Staple; Lewes, those of Barcomb, Buttinghill, Dean, Fishergate, Holmstrow, Lewes, Poynings, Preston, Street, Swanborough, Whalesbone, and Younsmere; and Pevensey, those of Alciston, Bishopstone, Burley-Arches, or Burarches, Danehill-Horsted, Dill, Eastbourne, East Grinstead, Flexborough, Hartfield, Longbridge, Loxfield-Dorset, Loxfield-Pelham, Ringmer, Rotherfield, Rushmonden, Shiplake, Totnore, and Willingdon, and the lowey of Pevensey..." Sussex contains the city and port of Chichester; and the following members of the cinque-ports, viz., Hastings, Rye, Seaford, and Winchelsea, all which have markets except Seaford; the borough, market town, and sea-port of Horsham; the borough and market towns of Arundel, East Grinstead, Lewes, Midhurst, Shoreham, and Steyning; the borough of Bramber; the market towns and sea-ports of Brighton and Hastings; and the market towns of Cuckfield, Hailsham, Little Hampton, Petworth, and Worthing. (See also GenUKI's Sussex Gazeteer.)

Earliest Combs of Sussex

Hugh and Norman de CUMBES, were undoubtedly Norman (or descended from Normans) given their close association with the families of William de BRAOSE (BRIOUZE) and Robert de HARCOURT of Normandy, France and West Sussex, England, who were both among the 2,000 plus who accompanied William in 1066, the former, a cousin of William the Conqueror, rewarded with one of the six rapes (territorial divisions) of Sussex: Bramber, which straddled the river Adur in West Sussex. (The Barons de Braose by Linda Denyer). Robert de HARCOURT, father of Phillip de HARCOURT below, was apparently the step-son of De BRAOSE, son of Eva de BOISSEY by an earlier husband, Anchetill de HARCOURT. (de Braose Web by Doug Thompson).


According to Braose, William de BRAOSE began building Bramber Castle, near Steyning on the estuary of the Adur, before 1073, and later built a second castle, the inland Knepp near Shipley, about 7 miles northwest of Bramber. In January 1080, William made certain gifts to the Florentine Abbey, and on 11 Dec 1093, he and Phillip reconfirmed the gifts. "The Chartulary of the Priory of Saint Peter at Sele," edited by L F Salzman, Cambridge, 1923, includes a translation of both the original gift, in which William states that "Phillip my only son freely consents," and a second, later charter when Phillip's confirmation is allowed by his wife (widow?), Aanor (daughter of Judael de TOTNES, Lord of Barnstaple, Devonshire), and his son, William, this latter document witnessed by Hugh de CUMBES:

4 Jan (est. 1120-39) "Philip de BRAIOSA, when he was setting out for Jerusalem, confirmed his father's gift, which his father, William de BRAIOSA, made to God and the church of Saint Florent, namely, the church of the holy martyrs Gervase and Prothase at Braiosa, and the church of Saint Peter of Sela and of Saint Nicholas of Brambria, with the churches, tithes and other rents belonging to the above-named churches, and [rights] in woodland, open country and waters. But the church of Scapuleia he exchanged with the monks of Saint Florent for the church of Wassingetona [Washington]; from which church of Scapuleia the monks had yearly 4s and all the tithe of the demesne. On his return from Jerusalem, Philip graciously gave and confirmed the church of Saint Mary of the port [de Haura] of Sorham [Shoreham] as it rightly belonged to the said monks. This grant of Philip's was allowed by his wife Aanor and William his son on 4 January."
Witnesses - Silvester the monk, Roger the monk, Robert the monk, another Robert who was then prior of Sele, Robert the chaplain, Oliver who then drew up this charter, Richard de HARECUR[T], Robert le SAUVAGE, Simon le CONTE, William de POINTEL, Hugh de CUMBES, BUCEI, Thomas TAILEBOS, William son of ASCHETIL, Oliver de SACCO, Adam de CHERNELLA and others."
While the year of the above document is not known, William de BRAOSE, 1st Lord of Bramber, died about 1096, and the first of several known trips to Jerusalem by his Crusader son, Phillip, 2nd Lord of Bramber, was ca 1097-1100. Although Aanor is not identified as widow, but wife, it seems probable that this document was executed not long after Phillip's death was reported. Phillip died in Jerusalem ca 1137 (Braose) or between 1134 and 1155 (de Braose Web), succeeded by his son, William, 3rd Lord of Bramber. Presumably, the above Hugh de CUMBES was the same as Hugone de CUMB (and his brother ("fratre eius") Normanno de CUMB) who witnessed three charters that appear to be contemporary (See Combs &c. of Sussex).
Charter 1: "Philippus de HARECOURT, decanus Lincolnie universis fidelibus sancte ecclesie salutem. Omnibus filiss sancte ecclesie hac presenti vita fruentibus et ominibus nostris sequentibus notum atque certum constet quantinus Ego Philippus de HARECOURT decanus Lincolnie evangilicis verbis quibus dicitur. Reddite que sunt cesaris (sic) et que sunt Die Deo, et sancti Spiritus gratia excitatus, Deo et Beate Marie et militibus Templi Salomonici perpetualiter in elemosina dono et concedo quandam partem terrenorum bonorum que Deus in hoc seccolo michi possidre concessit, videlicet terram de heshapeleia [Shipley] cum ominibus revus ad eam pertinentibus et eccleian eisdem ville et volo et iebeo quantinus predicti milites predicam terram et ecclesiam et omnia ad ea pertinencia volo et iubeo ut ita quiete et libere et absolute haveant et teneant sicut in tempore henrici Anglici Regis. Hec omnia Ricardus Frater meus a Philippo de BRAOSIA suo et meo patruo habuit et tenuit. Hoc donum facio pro salute mee anime et animarum meorum antecessorum. Hiis testibus Hugone DE CUMB(IS), Normanno DE CUMB(IS), Simone COMITE, Willelmo BERNEHUS, Roberto BOCCIO, Nicholao BERNEHUS, Tusina Fratre de Templo."

Charter 2: "Willelmus de BRAOSA Omnibus suis Baronibus ceteris que suis hominibus, tam Anglicis quam Normannicis, et universis fidelibus sancte ecclesie. Universi filii sancte ecclesie qui quoque sunt et qui futuri sunt ssciant quatinus ego Willelmus de BRAOSIA vlo et concedo et confirmo illud quod Phiipupus [Phillipus?] de HARECOURT, decanus Lincolnie feciit Deo et militibus Templi Jerusalem videlicet de tota terra de Heshchapelia [Shipley] quam Richardus Frater ipsious Philippi ei dederat et de ecclesia similite quam terram et quam ecclesiam volo et concedo quod predicti milites et Fratres ita teneant et habeant in pace et quite et libere et aabsolute sicut ipse Ricardus de HARCOURT Frater ipsius Philipp habuit et tenuit a Philippe de BRAOSIA patre meo, et precor omnes meos posteros ut ita concedant sicut concedo perpetualiter in elemosina. Hiss testibus. Hugon DE CONBIS (SIC), Normanno DE CONBIS, Simone C[O]MITE, Nicholao BERNHUS, Willelmo BERNEHUS, Tustino Fratre de Templo."

Charter 3: "Wllilmus de BRAOSA Omnibus suis hominibus de Cstellearia Brembre, tam Clercis quam laicis, et omnibus sancte Dei Ecclesie filis salutem et in Christo dileccionem, Noum sit vobis omnibus quod Ego Willelmus de BRAOSA concessi et confirmaui donacionem quam mater mea Anor dedit pro anima patris mei Philippi et pro animabus antecessorum nostrorum et eciam pro redempcione peccatorum nostrorum militibus Fratribus de Templo Salomonis, scilicet quinque acra de dote sua apud portum Brembrie [Port of Bramber], concessi eciam et confirmaui donacionem illam illis solute et quiete in elemosinam tenendam. Testibus. Hugone DE CUMBIS et Normano Fratre eius, Heueo de HARCOURT, et Simone COMITE, et Buceo de SILLINTONA et Oliuer Clercio" (Extracted from "Records of the Templars in England in the Twelfth Century, The Inquest of 1185 with illustrative charters and documents," edited by Beatrice A Lees, M.A., London Published for the British Academy by Humphrey Milford Oxford University Press, 1935, p.227-9, by Combs Researcher Joe Kendalll who adds that these charters were executed the same date(?))
In the first charter, Phillip de HARCOURT, deacon of Lincoln, gifts the manor and church of Shipley to the newly-established* Order of the Knights of the Temple of Solomon ("militibus Templi Salomonici "). The second and third charters are confirmations by William de BRAOSE of Castle Bramber ("C[a]stellearia Brembre"), who identifies himself in the third charter as the son of Phillip ("patris mei Philippi") and Aanor ("mater mea Anor"). Presumably, William is the signer due to his father being deceased (or in Jerusalem?). Braose estimates the year of these charters as ca 1125 and de Braose Web as between 1125 and 1130. Ms. Lees adds in a footnote (#2) that "Philip de Harcourt, dean of Lincoln, became Chancellor to King Stephen in 1139. He was nominated to the see of Salisbury in 1140, but rejectd by the chapter. He was consecrated bishop of Bayeux in 1142 and died in 1163. D'Albon dates this charter c. 1140-20 [sic], but it probably belongs to 1139 at latest, before Phillip succeeded Roger le Poor as Chancellor."
*The Order of the Knights of the Temple of Solomon ("militibus Templi Salomonici" and "militibus Fratribus de Templo Salomonis") was established in Jerusalem in 1119. (The writings of Archbishop William of Tyre, "Knights of Christ? The Templars, Hospitallers and other military orders in the eyes of their contemporaries, 1128-1291" by Helen Nicholson).
Combs researcher Joe Kendalll adds that "Combe manor Sussex was in the Rape of Bramber, Hugh and Norman CUMBA being among William de Braose chief men, hence their prominant place as the first witnesses." We do not yet have any additional records of either Combe manor or Hugh and Norman, including those referenced, and nothing more is known at this timje of Hugh and Norman de CUMB; however, only 1.38 miles northwest of the parish of Bramber, seat of Bramber Castle, is the parish of Coombes, where later the Rector of Coombes was the patron of the living at Phillip de Harcourt's Shipley, and where Nigel de COUMBES was Lord of Applesham Manor by 1336. Whether the parish was named for its location or its residents, or vice versa, is also not yet known.


In 1278, one Sir John de COMBE (CUMBES), Knight, is recorded as having one "knight fee" Suss., and "destrained for Knighthood."* (P.W.). (Extracted by Combs Researcher Leslie Owens from: "Knights of Edward I," A-E, Vol 1, by Harleian Society's Publication 1929, p. 228)

* Distrain: To take as a pledge property of another and keep it until he performs his obligation or until the property is replevied by the sheriff. (Black's Law...)
In 1289, one Nigel de CUMBE had permision to enter the Chinting, Sussex, tenements which he had acquired from Lucy de WAUNCY, and in 1316, one Nicholas de CUMBE was a Lord of that part of Catherington, Hants, which "belonged to this fee." The parish in which Chinting lay has not yet been located, but Catherington was less than five mi. from Compton, Sussex, thus the two tracts may have been geographically close:
[Respecting "Honor of Arundel"] "....Thomas TYREL succeeded and died in 1240, when the sheriff of Sussex was ordered to assign dower to Alice late wife of the said Thomas in his land in Chinting, Sussex, which he held of the king in chief. Custody of the land and heirs of the same Thomas was assigned to Roger le GRAS, and in 1241 dower was assigned to Alice in her late husband's land in Catherington, Hants.; her right to marry her daughters, which she claimed by sale made to her by Hugh earl of Arundel, was under examination until it was decided whether the right belonged to her or to the king. In 1242-3 Thomas TYREL (sic) was returned as holding I fee in Catherington of ancient feoffment of the earl of Arundel, and in 1243 Roger le Gras complained that the sheriff of Southampton wrongfully disseised him of the custody of the land late of Thomas TYREL in Catherington. In the ensuing year the service of John le CUNTE for I fee in Catherington was assigned to the pourparty of Roger de SOMERY and Nicholaa his wife.

Robert CORBET, William WANCY and dame Oliva TYREL held the manor Chinting in 1275 of the king in chief. In 1284 Lucy de WAUNCY made a settlement of lands in Catherington, Hants., and lands in Sussex on Roger de WAUNCY and his heirs, subject to her life interest, with an ultimate remainder to her heirs. In 1289 Nigel de CUMBE had permission to enter tenements in Chinting which he had acquired from Lucy de WAUNCY. The fee appears to have descended by the marriage of Thomas TYREL'S three daughters in the families of OLMSTEDE, HANGELTON and CUMBE.

In 1312 John de OLMESTEDE held at his death a third part of a messuage in Chinting by the courtesy of England after the death of Matilda his wife, daughter and heir of Olive TYREL, of the king in chief by the service of the third part of a serjeanty of finding in the king's army a man with unbarded horse, with haqueton, hauberk, sword and knife for 40 days and castle guard of Pevensey; William his son was aged 27 years. Ralph de HANGLETON and his parceners held Catherington in 1284-5 or 1302, and in 1316 Richard de HANGLETON and Nicholas de CUMBE were Lords of that part of Catherington which belonged to this fee."
(Extracted by Combs Researcher Joe Kendalll and transcribed by Combs Researcher Denise Mortoff from HONORS AND KNIGHT'S FEES, Ferrars, William, ed., Oxford Press, 1913, p. 80)
These de COMBES have not been researched actively, but it is unlikely that it is coincidence that the next de CUMBE found in Sussex is a Nigel, nor that his land is in Coombes, rape of Bramber.
Sutton by Seford [Seaford]. A messuage and half a carucate of land (extent given), held for life of the king in chief, by service of finding two parts of a light horseman (hobelarii) in the king's war in Wales, for forty days at his own charges.

Excete by Seford [Seaford]. 9a. pasture, held for life of John de SEINTCLER, by service of a rose yearly.

The reversion of the aforesaid lands and tenements after the death of the said Nigel, pertains to Joan the wife of William BONET, aged 26 years and more, by the grant of William JOLIF.

Appelsham in Coumbes [Coombes]. The manor (extent given) held, to him and the heirs of his body, of John de MOUBRAY, by service of two knights' fees; the reversion whereof belongs to Richard de COUMBES, aged 40 years and more [born bef 1296], by a fine levied in the king's court, because the said Nigel died without heir of his body; and 15a. arable and 11a. marsh, held for life of John de MOUBRAY, as parcel of the said manor; the reversion whereof belongs to Joan, daughter of John atte CHAUMBRE, aged 11 years and more, by a fine levied in the king's court.
(Great Britain. Calendar of Inquisitions Post-Mortem, published 1906 by His Majesties Stationery Office, London, copied by Combs Researcher Joe Kendalll and transcribed by Combs Researcher Denise Mortorff, Vol. 7, p.463, C.Edw. III. File 43. (9))

The reference to the "king's war in Wales" would appear to be to the Welsh wars of Edward I (r1272-1307), a series of campaigns which took place during the period 1277-1282, over 50 years before the aobve inquest took place. Was Nigel that old, or were these hereditary holdings? (Braose states that the Exchequer Accounts and Pipe Roll, 16 Edward I (1288) include record of William de BRAOSE (6th Lord of Bramber) and the seige of Emblyn (Jan 1288), and that William's men included knights from Bramber). A carucate was a measure, originally the amount of land a plough pulled by a team of eight oxen could clear in a day


John de MOWBRAY of Bramber was the son of John de MOWBRAY of Gower and Alina de BRAOSE, daughter of William, 7th Lord of Bramber. In 1322, John de MOWBRAY of Gower was hung at York. According to Braose, Alina "fled by boat to Ilfracombe in Devon but her hiding place was discovered. She and her son John were thrown into the Tower of London." (Braose) John the younger married Joan Plantagenet, daughter of Henry, Earl of Lancaster (Mowbray, the Baronial Family)

Richard de COMBE (COMBES), born bef 1296, and heir to Nigel, but their relationship unknown, died 22 Jun 1359, his heir his daughter, Joan de COMBES, born bef 1343:
12 April 24 Edward III [ca 1360]. Writ. 1 May, 24 Edward III. Sussex Inq. taken at Bembre [Bramber?]. No. 508. Richard de COMBE (COMBES).

Applesham. The manor, held of John de MOUBRAY by service of two knights' fees.

Hoo in the parish of Launcyngg [Lancing]. Tenements (unspecified) held of the same Sir John de MOUBRAY by service of an eighth part of a knight's fee and by rendering 5d. yearly.

He held no other lands &c. in the county.

He died on 22 June, 23 Edward III [ca 1359]. Joan de COMBES, his daughter, aged 17 years and more [b bef 1343], is his heir.
Great Britain. Calendar of Inquisitions Post-Mortem, published 1906 by His Majesties Stationery Office, London, copied by Combs Researcher Joe Kendalll and transcribed by Combs Researcher Denise Mortorff, Vol. 9, p. 370, C. Edw. III. File 107. (11))
Nothing more is known of Joan de COMBES yet, nor of how and when Nigel came to acquire the manor of Applesham (from Richard to whom it reverted?).


Extracted by Combs Researcher Joe Kendalll from "Records of the Templars in England in the Twelth Century, The Inquest of 1185 with illustrative charters and documents." Edited by Beatrice A Lees, M.A., London, published for the British Academy by Humphrey Milford, Oxford University Press, 1935.

p.227-9:

c. 1139 (footnote "2": Philip de harcourt , dean of LIncoln, became Chancellor to King Stephen in 1139, He was nominated to the see of Salisbury in 1140, but rejectd by the chapter. He was consecrated bishop of Bayeux in 1142 and died in 1163. D'Albon dates this charter (c. 1140-20, but it is probably belongs to 1139 at latest, before Phillip succeeded Roger le Poor as Chancellor,")

Philippus de Harecourt, decanus Lincolnie universis fidelibus sancte ecclesie salutem. Omnibus filiss sancte ecclesie hac presenti vita fruentibus et ominibus nostris sequentibus notum atque certum constet quantinus Ego Philippus de Harecourt decanus Lincolnie evangilicis verbis quibus dicitur. Reddite que sunt cesaris (sic) et que sunt Die Deo, et sancti Spiritus gratia excitatus, Deo et Beate Marie et militibus Templi Salomonici perpetualiter in elemosina dono et concedo quandam partem terrenorum bonorum que Deus in hoc seccolo michi possidre concessit, videlicet terram de heshapeleia cum ominibus revus ad eam pertinentibus et eccleian eisdem ville et volo et iebeo quantinus predicti milites predicam terram et ecclesiam et omnia ad ea pertinencia volo et iubeo ut ita quiete et libere et absolute haveant et teneant sicut in tempore henrici Anglici Regis. Hec omnia Ricardus Frater meus a Philippo de Braosia suo et meo patruo habuit et tenuit . Hoc donum facio pro salute mee anime et animarum meorum antecessorum. Hiis testibus Hugone de Cumb(is), Normanno de Cumb(is), Simone Comite ,Willelmo Bernehus, Roberto Boccio, Nicholao Bernehus, Tusina Fratre de Templo. [JK: the foot note says that COMBIS is really CUMBES as per the following charters.)

2) comfirmation of above by William de Braosa Lord of Bramber "Apparently first cousin of Philip de Harcourt , dean of Lincoln. Will de Braose II wa son of Philip 'patruus' of Philip de Harcourt". JK: Note that Combe manor Sussex was in the Rape of Bramber. Hugh and Norman Cumba being among William de Braose chief men. Hence thier prominant place as the first witnesses. (1139)

Willelmus de Braosa Omnibus suis Baronibus ceteris que suis hominibus , tam Anglicis quam Normannicis, et universis fidelibus sancte ecclesie . Universi filii sancte ecclesie qui quoque sunt et qui futuri sunt ssciant quatinus ego Willelmus de Braosia vlo et concedo et confirmo illud quod Phiipupus de Harecourt, decanus Lincolnie feciit Deo et militibus Templi Jerusalem videlicet de tota terra de Heshchapelia (Shiply in footnote) quam Richardus Frater ipsious Philippi ei dederat et de ecclesia similite quam terram et quam ecclesiam volo et concedo quod predicti milites et Fratres ita teneant et habeant in pace et quite et libere et aabsolute sicut ipse Ricardus de Harcourt Frater ipsius Philipp habuit et tenuit a Philippe de Braosia patre meo , et precor omnes meos posteros ut ita concedant sicut concedo perpetualiter in elemosina. Hiss testibus. Hugon de conbis (sic), Normanno de Conbis, Simone Cmite, Nicholao Bernhus, Willelmo Bernehus , Tustino Fratre de Templo.

3) second confirmatin of same date.

Wllilmus de Braosa Omnibus suis hominibus de Cstellearia Brembre, tam Clercis quam laicis , et omnibus sancte Dei Ecclesie filis salutem et in Christo dileccionem, Noum sit vobis omnibus quod Ego Willelmus de Braosa concessi et confirmaui donacionem quam mater mea Anor dedit pro anima patris mei Philippi et pro animabus antecessorum nostrorum et eciam pro redempcione peccatorum nostrorum militibus Fratribus de Templo Salomonis, scilicet quinque acra de dote sua apud portum Brembrie , concessi eciam et confirmaui donacionem illam illis solute et quiete in elemosinam tenendam. Testibus . Hugone de cumbis et Normano Fratre eius, Heueo de Harcourt, et Simone Comite, et Buceo de Sillintona et Oliucr Clercio

JK Notes: This latter shows that Hugh and Norman were brothers; i.e., "Fratre eius."


Extracted and transcribed by Combs Researchers Denise Mortorff and Joe Kendalll from "HONORS AND KNIGHT'S FEES," William Ferrars, ed, Oxford Press, 1913, p. 80, "…with respect to "Honor of Arundel""

"....Thomas TYREL succeeded and died in 1240, when the sheriff of Sussex was ordered to assign dower to Alice late wife of the said Thomas in his land in Chinting, Sussex, which he held of the king in chief.

Custody of the land and heirs of the same Thomas was assigned to Roger le GRAS, and in 1241 dower was assigned to Alice in her late husband's land in Catherington, Hants.; her right to marry her daughters, which she claimed by sale made to her by Hugh earl of ARUNDEL, was under examination until it was decided whether the right belonged to her or to the king. In 1242-3 Thomas TYREL (sic) was returned as holding I fee in Catherington of ancient feoffment of the earl of Arundel, and in 1243 Roger le GRAS complained that the sheriff of Southampton wrongfully disseised him of the custody of the land late of Thomas TYREL in Catherington. In the ensuing year the service of John le CUNTE for I fee in Catherington was assigned to the pourparty of Roger de SOMERY and Nicholaa his wife.

Robert CORBET, William WANCY and dame Oliva TYREL held the manor Chinting in 1275 of the king in chief. In 1284 Lucy de WAUNCY made a settlement of lands in Catherington, Hants., and lands in Sussex on Roger de WAUNCY and his heirs, subject to her life interest, with an ultimate remainder to her heirs. In 1289 Nigel de CUMBE had permission to enter tenements in Chinting which he had acquired from Lucy de WAUNCY. The fee appears to have descended by the marriage of Thomas TYREL'S three daughters in the families of OLMSTEDE, HANGELTON and CUMBE.

In 1312 John de OLMESTEDE held at his death a third part of a messuage in Chinting by the courtesy of England after the death of Matilda his wife, daughter and heir of Olive TYREL, of the king in chief by the service of the third part of a serjeanty of finding in the king;s army a man with unbarded horse, with haqueton, hauberk, sword and knife for 40 days and castle guard of Pevensey; William his son was aged 27 years. Ralph de HANGLETON and his parceners held Catherington in 1284-5 or 1302, and in 1316 Richard de HANGLETON and Nicholas de CUMBE were Lords of that part of Catherington [Hampshire] which belonged to this fee.


Extracted and transcribed by Combs Researchers Denise Mortorff and Joe Kendalll from "Great Britain. CALENDAR OF INQUISITIONS POST MORTEM," 1906 by His Majesties Stationery Office, London." Dates are estimates by Joe and provided in brackets [ ] after the King's name:

V.7, p.463 [Sussex]
680. NIGEL DE COUMBES or DE COMBES.
Writ, 7 August 9 Edward III.
SUSSEX. Inq. 15 September, 9 Edward III. [1336]

Sutton by Seford [Seaford]. A messuage and half a carucate of land (extent given), held for life of the king in chief, by service of finding two parts of a light horseman (hobelarii) in the king's war in Wales, for forty days at his own charges.

Excete by Seford [Seaford]. 9a. pasture, held for life of John de SEINTCLER, by service of a rose yearly. The reversion of the aforesaid lands and tenements after the death of the said Nigel, pertains to Joan the wife of William BONET, aged 26 years and more, by the grant of William JOLIF.

Appelsham in Coumbes. The manor (extent given) held, to him and the heirs of his body, of John de MOUBRAY, by service of two knights' fees; the reversion whereof belongs to Richard de COUMBES, aged 40 years and more [before 1296], by a fine levied in the king's court, because the said Nigel died without heir of his body; and 15a. arable and 11a. marsh, held for life of John de MOUBRAY, as parcel of the said manor; the reversion whereof belongs to Joan, daughter of John atte CHAUMBRE, aged 11 years and more, by a fine levied in the king's court.
C. Edw. III. File 43. (9.)


V.9, p.370
508. RICHARD DE COMBE or DE COMBES.
Writ, 12 April, 24 Edward III.
SUSSEX. Inq. taken at Bembre, 1 May, 24 Edward III [1351]

Applesham. The manor, held of John de MOUBRAY by service of two knights' fees.

Hoo in the parish of Launcyngg. Tenements (unspecified) held of the same Sir John de MOUBRAY by service of an eighth part of a knight's fee and by rendering 5d. yearly. He held no other lands &c. in the county.

He died on 22 June, 23 Edward III. Joan de COMBES, his daughter, aged 17 years and more, is his heir. [estimated at b. c. 1333]
  1. Edw. III. File 107. (11.)

See also Earliest Combes &c. of England

Ed Note: I don't recall why the following was added here, but soon as I do, I'l be sure and add that information.

Lewes, a borough and market town, chiefly in the hundred and rape of Lewes, county of Sussex, of which it is the chief town, 7 miles ENE of Brighton, 38 NE of Chichester, and 50 SE of London, containing, with the parishes of St. Thomas in the Cliffe and St. John the Baptist Southover, the former in the hundred of Ringmer, and the latter in the hundred of Swanborought… Lewes is a borough by prescription, having formerly had a separate shrievalty, but not incorporated… There were anciently eleven parish churches within the borough, but these have been reduced to four. In the 37th of Henry VIII, the parishes of St. Andrew, St. Mary in Foro, St. Martin, and St. Michael, were united, and now form the parish of St. Michael, the living of which is a discharged rectory, with the rectory of St. Andrew annexed… in the patronage of the Crown. The church… contains, among other mural monuments, a splendid one to the memory of Sir Nicholas PELHAM, Knt., and Anne, his wife. St. Anne's consists of the united parishes of St. Peter within, and St. Mary West-out, (the latter being without the borough boundaries, the line of demarcation passing through the chancel of the church of St. Mary,) and that part of the parish which is westward of the borough, being within the hundred of Swanborough. Although the parochial church is dedicated to St. Anne, the parish, in all law proceedings, is denominated St. Peter's and St. Mary's West-out. The living is a discharged rectory… and in the patronage of the Crown…. St. John's under the Castle is a rectory, to which that of St. Mary Magdalene was annexed in 1539… and in the patronage of the Rev. Peter CROFTS… The living of All Saints' is a discharged rectory… in the patronage of Charles GORING, Esq. The church… was begun in 1805, on the union of the parishes of the Holy Trinity, St. Peter the Less, and St. Nicholas. All the preceding parishes are in the archdeaconry of Lewes, and diocese of Chichester. The precinct of the castle is extra-parochial, and is not rateable within the borough, nor subject to any ecclesiastical jurisdiction… The parishes of St. Thomas in the Cliff, and St. John, Southover, although without the limits of the borough, may be considered as forming part of the town of Lewes. The living of St. Thomas's is a discharged rectory, in the peculiar jurisdiction and patronage of the Archbishop of Canterbury… The living of the parish of St. John, Southover, is a discharged rectory, in the archdeaconry of Lewes, and diocese of Chichester… in the patronage of the Crown… The free grammar school was founded originally at Southover, by Agnes MORLEY, in 1512…

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