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Gennet: variant spelling for Janet

gentleman (gent.): a title whose meaning varied depending upon the year(s), although originally a man of noble or gentle birth, later a member of the landed gentry, the lowest degree of nobility, above the rank of yeoman, and later yet, a man of independent means (merchants, etc.). (Black's Law) According to The Dictionary of Genealogy by Terrick V H Fitzhugh, "In the Middle Ages, the word 'gentil' meant 'noble,' but 'gentleman' came into use in the fifteenth century to signify a condition between baron and yeoman, or sometimes between knight and yeoman, after a statute of 1412 had laid down that in certain legal documents the 'estate, degree or mystery' of the defendant must be stated. In 1429 the term les gentils was used in an Act of Parliament, of men having freehold property worth 40 shillings per year or more. From the sixteenth century onward, the distinction between gentlemen and yeomen lay more in their way of life than in their relative prosperity. A gentlemen did not work with his hands, so his household included personal servants; whereas the servants of a yeoman were his assistants on the land and in the dairy. A gentleman's son was often described as a yeoman while he was working his holding, pending inheritance of his father's lands. Members of the professions, i.e. army and naval officers and barristers, were regarded as gentlemen, some of them being entitled to the description 'Esquire'. For apprenticing a son to a London citizen a property qualification was required, so many gentlemen's sons entered the more profitable trades of the City. When a man, who during his working life was designated by his occupation (for example, tailor), retired, he would often then describe himself as 'Gentleman' as he was no longer gainfully employed." [This definition has not yet been confirmed in its entirety]. See also English Heraldry



gentleman-commoner: effective 1687, any of a privileged class of commoners formerly required to pay higher fees than ordinary commoners at the universities of Oxford and Cambridge

Ginger, Ginnie, Ginny: nickname for Virginia

glover: dealer or maker of gloves Example

goodman a title indicating an adult male who ranked above a freeman, but below a gentleman; (see above); also, particularly in the colonies, used to denote a male head of household.

goodwife goody, goodie (colonial) title indicating mistress of the household. Example

Green: nickname for Greenbury, Greenberry (and sometimes for Revolutionary War General Thomas Green (namessake))

grippe: influenza (flu) Example

Gulielmi: (latin) given name, William


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